Thread: Noah.
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Old 07-04-2012, 02:52 PM
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Kilkenny Kilkenny is offline
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Location: Devon, United Kingdom
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Re: Noah.

Given your style of sculpting, I can see this develop well. I'm not so sure about the plank of 4"x2" PAR supplied by the local builders' merchants!

Having now read the story, and seen your sketch, I’ll add a few thoughts, but only the thoughts I might explore were I making the sculpture rather than you.

First, Second and Third Adam.
Analogically, in a sense this is a second beginning, isn’t it? God has decided that man’s corruption, and his corruption of the entire world as well, cannot be tolerated. God is referred to as repenting having made man at all. He is full of grief and regret. The story, then, is about the destruction by God of this special thing that he created, and of His desire for a potential new beginning. Like the Adam story, man had fallen from grace - Noah as a new Adam. This would be a potent parallel for me (and of course Christ was the next attempt by God to save mankind from his evil – the third Adam). Note also that Noah goes on to drunkenness and cursing his fellow man. Noah falls like all men, just as Adam did originally.

For me, this set of meanings has real relevance. We experience our own sense of the failure of mankind today. Our ‘evils’ seem to overwhelm all the good we might do. This is a very relevant theme.

I might also suspect, though, that the writers of the Noah story were essentially setting out to create a genealogy of their tribe that links the tribe back to God – a narrative of POWER, in fact. (The list of the generations of the sons of Noah follows the story). It may be a narrative that is designed to make of God a special friend of this particular tribe – the narrative, then, is self-serving and political. God's saving of Noah above ALL other human beings reinforces the primacy of the tribe - it's authority. The description of Noah may confirm this too: he was 600 years old at the time of the flood and lived to over 900 years when other men had an age of about 120 years. This may set out to show God's favouring of Noah - the patriarch.

For me it is a story that is only saved by the image of man that emerges – one I recognise. And we have a story in which even God admits failure (failed maker - nice sculptor analogy. I know about that failure myself! And of the desire to destroy it all!).
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Last edited by Kilkenny : 07-04-2012 at 03:58 PM.
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