Sculpture Community - Sculpture.net  

Go Back  Sculpture Community - Sculpture.net > Art Lounge and Gallery > Images Gallery
User Name
Password
Home Sculpture Community Photo Gallery ISC Sculpture.org Register FAQ Members List Search New posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 04-12-2012, 09:31 PM
chris 71's Avatar
chris 71 chris 71 is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: ont canada
Posts: 1,053
gnarly log

just got another log this one is very interesting its a box elder. but i love how gnarled it is. the wood is sometimes very colorful with a real red pink flaming inside. only trouble is it will fade i think this piece is also splatted.

Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 04-12-2012, 09:39 PM
craigktx's Avatar
craigktx craigktx is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Port Aransas tx
Posts: 1,153
Re: gnarly log

Yep that's a log, carve it. The color will be what the color is. It's not christmas on santas lap it's just a great present.
Size?
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 04-12-2012, 11:18 PM
Robson Valley Robson Valley is offline
Level 8 user
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: McBride, BC, Canada
Posts: 206
Re: gnarly log

Mask up if there's any sign of spalting fungus in it. Your lungs will appreciate it.
Don't be too quick to dive into it. Prize pieces like that deserve some deliberation!
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 04-13-2012, 07:46 AM
chris 71's Avatar
chris 71 chris 71 is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: ont canada
Posts: 1,053
Re: gnarly log

craig its about 8 feet long and 24 to 28 inches wide maybe a little wider in spots. and a great present it is sure feels like christmas

robson my mind is cooking up all kinds of ideas to the point of messin with my sleep patterns. i have been reading about spalting and fungus. im a little confused. some of what i read said its of no real concerned to your health. ofcoarse the dust is. but what about the fungus that causes the spalting and the flaming i read may be caused by a fungus from a beatle. do you have any more info about this sort of thing? i do were a mask but the dust is really pretty inescapable . i mean it gets in your cloths hair everything.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 04-13-2012, 01:29 PM
Robson Valley Robson Valley is offline
Level 8 user
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: McBride, BC, Canada
Posts: 206
Re: gnarly log

Here's what I do know:
As the fungus matures, they all attempt to reproduce in casting off spores, somewhat akin to the pollen from flowers. Anyway, the spores become a part of the dust load in your shop air. As they are very small, they can penetrate to the very smallest of places in lung tissue. This is sure to trigger an immune system response to deal with the foreign crud. OK, so you beat it, nothing more happens = "they" say it won't harm you.
Wrong. Like the dust, the spores are an irritant. Mobile macrophage cells and fibroblasts attempt to deal with the physical irritation, always leaving a tag of nonelastic scarring. It becomes an additive thing over time. While your "house-keeping" system is dealing with the crud, that leaves less of it to deal with anything else which comes along, anything else which poses a real air-borne threat.

I carve western red cedar. The mounds and drifts of chips in the floor are quite benign. I don't sand at all indoors if I can possibly avoid it. The airflow and geometry of my house would have the place filled with dust, everywhere, in the first 24 hrs! There's got to be a way to contain the dust, at least to pump it out of the house/shop, away from you. I realize that air exchange and heating is a complex and expensive issue during a Canadian winter.
In the diamond willow furniture shop, a block down my street, that guy has every kind of motorized sander there is. He may do nothing but sand for 30 days in a row. His DE is on wheels, has a 12" squirrel cage fan and 2 x 6" pickup hoses, never more than 2" from the active machine. That leaves his shop clean enough for Tung Oil finishing.
Some things to consider.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 04-14-2012, 07:18 AM
chris 71's Avatar
chris 71 chris 71 is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: ont canada
Posts: 1,053
Re: gnarly log

thanks for the info brian.
i guess what im wondering is,
is the spalting color change inside the tree do too a fungus infection on the surface of the tree?
or is the spalting inside the tree the actully fungus?
if the fungus lives and multiplies by releasing spores, why would it grow in the tree seems counter productive.
if the spalting is caused by a fungus infection on the surface of the tree,
and the splatingis not the actully fungus.
then what you would really have to worry about is the dust particals that would be disturbed when the tree is first being striped of bark and what not on the surface and the actully dust from the wood on the inside not being anymore dangerous the the normal wood dust.
dont know if any of this is at all what is really happening with this fungus and splating thing.
just trying to get to the bottom of this as a carver /sculptor im very visual
trying to get a picture in my mind to better understand the risk
thanks
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 04-14-2012, 11:39 AM
tobias tobias is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: canada
Posts: 744
Re: gnarly log

Hey nice hunk of wood! I think we call that stuff Manitoba maple here. I've carved some of it with that really nice red spalting. The red color stayed after I put finish on it. My brother used to make his own spalted wood. Put some spalted chips in a green garbage bag with non spalted wood and in a month or so you have spalting in the new wood. Only catch is the new wood must be green. It is a fungus it is in the wood not just on the surface.
As with any dust one time exposure is no big deal multiple exposure over years is a big deal. It's just good practise to wear a high quality respirator. On your clothing in your hair well I usually blow ot off with a compressor before I remove my respirator. Then shower immediately.
Something is gonna kill you in the long run. Shit happens. Carve have fun now watch out for busses. That would suck.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 04-14-2012, 01:04 PM
chris 71's Avatar
chris 71 chris 71 is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: ont canada
Posts: 1,053
Re: gnarly log

yep i could get hit by a bus or who knows what else. i'm here now and should just relax and carve and live to the fullest.
i admire those that can live like that
try telling that to the obsessive paranoid hypochondriac guy that lives in my head. hes so frickin' paranoid he probably would never get hit by a bus with those eyes in the back of his head and will out live us all lol!!.

but seriously my girl friend has some serious lung problems. the real bad kind of asthma.
been to the hospital 7 times in the last year, she usually has to stay there for a night or two. so i am also a little more concerned then if it was just me hear.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 04-14-2012, 02:43 PM
Robson Valley Robson Valley is offline
Level 8 user
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: McBride, BC, Canada
Posts: 206
Re: gnarly log

Reads like you've got it figured out. I like Tobias' description of DIY spalting.

Plus, he's got all the right ideas for personal protection. Take a look in TS's blog and watch him cut into basalt with a diamond blade. Just before he disappears in an explosion of rock dust, look closely at how he is dressed & equipped.

Skin on anything (people, apple, tree bark) is quite durable. Protects all the juicy, edible goodies inside and sweet, wet maple wood is no exception. Puncture the skin and the invasion begins.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 04-14-2012, 08:42 PM
Nelson Nelson is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: venezuela
Posts: 828
Re: gnarly log

Yes Chris I understand your curiosity and concern regarding health hazards. Keeping it simple may be easier to understanding the issue. Many young folks don`t pay enough attention to basic safety principles. The guys are right, prolonged exposure to floating particles of any sort will cause some lung illness down the road. Even steel particles float when grinding/cutting with power tools. Fungi do what they`re supposed to (rot wood if they like it). Spalted wood is appreciated by wood turners and hated by other professionals. Not only should you wear some protection against dust while you perform a task with wood,metal,stone, whatever, but also keeping your shop (specially if it`s not well ventilated) dust-free is of paramount importance. Hey here`s an effective natural receipe for cleaning lungs... blend a bottle honey with about 3-4 aloe vera leaves (peeled, just use flesh), and with aproximately 100 grms of ginger root (just scrape with a spoon under the water). Take a spoon early am, and another one before bed. The mix should be a bit hot from ginger, but works wonders.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 04-15-2012, 12:20 AM
Robson Valley Robson Valley is offline
Level 8 user
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: McBride, BC, Canada
Posts: 206
Re: gnarly log

And, if you should just so happen to cough up a lung or two, most medical schools are happy to accept specimens.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 04-15-2012, 10:20 AM
craigktx's Avatar
craigktx craigktx is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Port Aransas tx
Posts: 1,153
Re: gnarly log

I have had problems carving mesquite it burns my eyes and throat. I work outside and theres always a good breeze. I do wear a respirator but with the wind and 90+ deg temp it's a problem.
One day I moved my back to the wind while sanding with the grinder, it makes a ton of fine dust and a edie was formed. This wind effect pulls all the dust into your face. This left me with a bad cough and a sore throat. No visible fungus was in the wood tho all wood has some fungus in the bark.
Mesquite is high in tanins and when mixed with the wet parts of the body I.E lungs, eyes and even sweat it turns into tanic acid. Some people are allergic to mesquite and can't even eat food that has been BBQ with it. It also make a fine tie dye on your wet shirt.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 04-15-2012, 10:40 AM
Robson Valley Robson Valley is offline
Level 8 user
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: McBride, BC, Canada
Posts: 206
Re: gnarly log

I've been carving in western red cedar for years. However, I do know that the cedar dust has some toxic properties well known to mill employees & the Worker's Compensation Board. So far, I have done my very best to accept tool mark patterns and to avoid sanding altogether.
Craig: thanks for the description of the air flow problems, even in a breeze.
What do you think is best? Cross-Flow + respirator? I suppose even using a fan outdoors for insurance wouldn't hurt.
90F? No more than a frosty 25F here this AM.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 04-15-2012, 12:53 PM
chris 71's Avatar
chris 71 chris 71 is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: ont canada
Posts: 1,053
Re: gnarly log

thanks for the good info guys. and tonic recipe nelson. i just might try that sometime would it be like an expectorant?
i have heard about the acidic qualities of wood and suppose that is what explains the terrible heart burn i often get after carving.
i dont have a indoor shop just a garage. i carve outside the garage doors in the open. i have experienced the wind effect also.
sometimes its a good thing but not when it blows a nice chip in your eye hate when that happens.
i will be be using a respirator and can change cloths outside so as not to drag a cloud in the house.
i just got back from visiting my cousin who also is a carver borrowed a nice saw to cut it with. a real beastie in comparison to the little ones i use to carve.
im thinking about cutting it in halve and then carving the insides so i can leave all the great surface.
pretty sure i want too do a figure or some faces with this on. or just cut the bottom flat stand it up and do a face for faces /figures on the best spot leaving as much of the natural surface as i can. only problem with this is if i need to move it were it to sell its pretty heavy. brought to my house in a dump truck
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 04-15-2012, 01:51 PM
chris 71's Avatar
chris 71 chris 71 is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: ont canada
Posts: 1,053
Re: gnarly log

just surfing round the web more and found this i think after reading more tobias you said it right. i should be much more worried about swinging around the screaming chainsaws and the buses lol

copied and pasted hear

Seri Robinson
04-14-2010, 8:27 AM
Although I already responded to a private message, I might as well repeat myself here.

In general, you really shouldn't use certain types of spalted wood for load-bearing applications. White rot and its associated zone lines are very destructive. The stains, however, do not affect the strength of the wood and would be fine to use.

For a chair with lightly spalted wood, I'd keep the spalted wood away from supports and the rocking pieces themselves. There is no problem using it for the arm rests, back, seat, etc.

As for health, spalted wood isn't inherently any more dangerous than normal wood, and a lot better for you to breathe than many tropical woods. I've written about this issue extensively both here:

http://www.finewoodworking.com//blog...e/tag/spalting

and here:

http://web.mac.com/kaysa_gabriel/Nor...Blog/Blog.html

And Cody, I got my PhD in February. Woohoo! Now I'm a post doc, researching spalting full time.
hears a link to the full conversation.
http://http://www.sawmillcreek.org/a...t-137854.html?

Last edited by chris 71 : 04-15-2012 at 02:16 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 04-15-2012, 03:26 PM
craigktx's Avatar
craigktx craigktx is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Port Aransas tx
Posts: 1,153
Re: gnarly log

Quote:
Originally Posted by Robson Valley View Post
I've been carving in western red cedar for years. However, I do know that the cedar dust has some toxic properties well known to mill employees & the Worker's Compensation Board. So far, I have done my very best to accept tool mark patterns and to avoid sanding altogether.
Craig: thanks for the description of the air flow problems, even in a breeze.
What do you think is best? Cross-Flow + respirator? I suppose even using a fan outdoors for insurance wouldn't hurt.
90F? No more than a frosty 25F here this AM.
A cross flow works but i forget where to stand when iam carving. Too into it. I try not to use the grinder with the sanding disk when shaping anymore and part of the reason i have went to into more carved pieces.
The abortech with the new teeth puts out large shavings , the down side is the shavings prick my arms, legs and face. Again saftey gear would help until i pass out from heat stroke.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 04-15-2012, 08:59 PM
Nelson Nelson is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: venezuela
Posts: 828
Re: gnarly log

Something like that Chris.

It`s good tasting
It works
it`s natural
it`s easy to make
it`s an ancient proven medicine in India, and now in other parts of the tropics
it has no side effects
it`s even more needed in colder and humid climates

and it`s a free receipe, LOL.

When it comes to lungs health, they stay healthier warmer than in cold weather. Excessive moisture is bad. So here`s where a hot spicy root like ginger works wonders generating a therapeutic heat. Honey acts as a soothing carriage and the cleansing effects comes from the aloe vera. It`s interesting, one understands easily how wood or other foreign particles arrived at the lungs, but a medicine travels all the way through the digestive system before entering the blood stream where it reaches all parts of the body, and having also reached the lungs, is there where the effect takes place.
We are what we eat, what we breath and what we feel...

Last edited by Nelson : 04-15-2012 at 09:12 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 04-15-2012, 10:18 PM
Robson Valley Robson Valley is offline
Level 8 user
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: McBride, BC, Canada
Posts: 206
Re: gnarly log

We are what we eat, eats, too.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 04-15-2012, 10:34 PM
craigktx's Avatar
craigktx craigktx is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Port Aransas tx
Posts: 1,153
Re: gnarly log

Sorry. but bee spit just won't make the world go round. If you have a tiny problem these granny things work as does time. When your resurfacing your lungs because you got to far into your work. Well a more potent remedy is needed. I have to work tomorrow.

And as for India don't get me started, they have far more illnesses than the lot of us in the U.S.
Lets add tiger parts and horns, fins and all other manner of body parts so we can get a hard on. Sorry but Iam over the pick the good stuff of easter dogma. It sounds to much like western religion.

Last edited by craigktx : 04-15-2012 at 10:45 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 04-16-2012, 01:49 PM
Nelson Nelson is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: venezuela
Posts: 828
Re: gnarly log

Craig,
I was just giving an effective simple receipe. Not to get into complicated discusion on Eastern/Western issues, neither to change anybody`s believes. Read about Ayurveda to get a bit insight, but again if you`re happy eating pizza, donuts and twinkies, that`s ok. I like them too, lol. I`m saying there`s other ways. No need to get worked up. By the way, wasn`t Hippocrates the father of Western medicine who said: " let your food be your medicine and medicine be your food" If you read and understand the principles of Ayurveda, surprisingly that`s exactly what it says too. There MUST be some truth to it, when both approaches agree upon, don`t you think Craig????
But hey, neither hava I ever heard say bee spit makes the world turn, lol.

Last edited by Nelson : 04-17-2012 at 12:17 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 04-16-2012, 04:39 PM
chris 71's Avatar
chris 71 chris 71 is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: ont canada
Posts: 1,053
Re: gnarly log

yes with out bee spit we would all be dead.
what a job today trying to cut this log in half, my arms are spent, nee is popped. still dont have it in two pieces.
i missed connecting my cuts together. ive done this before with much better results.
this gnarly thing is a different story. i really want to see the inside but will have to wait till tomorrow.

Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 04-16-2012, 09:47 PM
Robson Valley Robson Valley is offline
Level 8 user
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: McBride, BC, Canada
Posts: 206
Re: gnarly log

Thanks for the illustration. Bee spit might not be much of a help here. I think you're rugged up, well enough. Hard to wait for the reveal!
Got files? I suspect that log will be hard as any on a power saw.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 04-17-2012, 12:31 AM
Nelson Nelson is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: venezuela
Posts: 828
Re: gnarly log

Hey Chris that progeny of yours standing at the back seem to be awaiting the precious moment, the birth of another member of the family. Very neat !
Did you know those gnarls are caused by some sort of virus or bacteria infection? Oh not me again bringing up plant pathology critters to the art scene. Just interesting facts along the way. Do you feel those knotty gnarls add complication to the chain work, or they are just visual bumps contributing nothing to wood hardness? It`d be nice if in some piece you could take advantage of those bumps, probably not easy as the chainsaw should carry on... Chris, are you somehow related to native Americans? I sense there`s a feeling in your sculpture pointing in that direction. I know Kokopelli has been depicted in any imaginable style, but did ever cross your mind to do your vertion? I myself feel lured to indians motives, for some unknown reason. Unfortunately, wood carving scapes my abilities, but I enjoy it.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 04-17-2012, 01:55 PM
chris 71's Avatar
chris 71 chris 71 is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: ont canada
Posts: 1,053
Re: gnarly log

its very hard, the burls usually make it even harder. i didnt sharpen the chain just because im not adapt at that just yet, but im sure it needs sharping now.
what a fight this was, im not a lumberjack by any means and my cutting shows it, quite a hack job. but alas its in two pieces now.

its not as splated or flame colored as i had hoped but it has some. really this log was picked because of its burls and twisted gnarls so thats ok.

nelson i do have native blood in me. my great gramma was a mohawk from the Iroquois. wich makes me an 8th native. but i also have french and scottish and english a real mongrol lol.
but yes i too see a sort of native, primitive look in my work. its not that im trying for this it just happens like that.
and its funny you mention Kokopelli. i was just at a garden show and a couple was thinking about buying another carving of mine. and they said they thought it was Kokopelli
they even joked they wouldnt put it in there bedroom because they did not want any more kids. i should say too i had never even heard of Kokopelli untill then had to ask them what it was.
anyway here it is like i said bit of a hack job but its now in two pieces and im stiil in one lol


Last edited by chris 71 : 04-17-2012 at 02:15 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 04-18-2012, 10:26 AM
tobias tobias is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: canada
Posts: 744
Re: gnarly log

I hate this part. I get the frigging thing chopped in half and then I see beauty just like it is. Crap I don't want to cut into this thing. It's too pretty I might screw it up!
If you have these feelings cut any how. It's just a hunk of wood. A hunk of wood with really nice lines...
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


Sculpture Community, Sculpture.net
International Sculpture Center, Sculpture.org
vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Russ RuBert