Sculpture Community - Sculpture.net  

Go Back  Sculpture Community - Sculpture.net > Art Lounge and Gallery > Art Lounge
User Name
Password
Home Sculpture Community Photo Gallery ISC Sculpture.org Register FAQ Members List Search New posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 04-17-2006, 10:50 PM
Merlion's Avatar
Merlion Merlion is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Singapore
Posts: 3,716
Practical Problem Solving

We sculptors are practical people, and from time to time we have to solve unusual practical problems big or small. I thought it would be useful if we can share our experience with others.

Here is one I tackled this morning.

I recently bought some liquid epoxy from my supplier and wanted to try it out in a small quantity. Unfortunately the epoxy resin and hardener both come in 2.5 kg (5 lb) open-top tins (or cans) that is hard to pour without making a mess. I thought of transfering them into my spare 5 kg (10 lb) plastic containers with a smaller opening, but I need funnels. Of course if I use a funnel for say the epoxy resin, I need to clean it very well before I can reuse it for the hardener, and this is quite troublesome.

At this stage, I do wish I have disposable funnels. I looked around, and notice many thin plastic disposable cups.

To cut the explanation short, I hope the photo below can show how I solved the problem. One thing the photo cannot show. I had to cut a hole at the bottom of the cup, about 1/2 in diam.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	ThrowawayFunnel060418.JPG
Views:	217
Size:	23.4 KB
ID:	2974  

Last edited by Merlion : 04-17-2006 at 11:09 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 04-18-2006, 01:06 PM
HappySculpting's Avatar
HappySculpting HappySculpting is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 450
Re: Practical Problem Solving

Hi Merlion,

Thanks for that tip on using a small plastic cup a funnel.

Here's a similar solution: In situations where I need a quick disposable funnel, I use a flexible thin, cheap paper plate. I roll it and stick in the hole and pour. It works very well and I don't have any problems with spilling or anything as long as I don't fill up the funnel too high.

-Tamara
__________________
Tamara
My Website My Blog
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 04-19-2006, 12:07 AM
jim jim is offline
Level 7 user
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: minnesota
Posts: 142
Re: Practical Problem Solving

I once saw a clown poor a cup of water into a funnel made of newspaper and the water disappeared! so what im getting at, is you could use newspaper but your liquid may disappear before entering the container....


75 and sunny out...jim
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 04-19-2006, 04:27 AM
Merlion's Avatar
Merlion Merlion is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Singapore
Posts: 3,716
Re: Practical Problem Solving

Here is my make-do solution to having a multi-purpose sculpting stand. I notice it costs too much to purchase one and so far none of them is really suitable for heavy as well as light works.

I come across this sturdy kitchen trolley by Ikea and adapted it for my use. It is strong enough for heavy jobs, say up to 100 lb, and has two wheels.

To do heavy sculpting jobs, I put the base board of such works on a lazy-susan turntable/ball-bearing on top, as shown below. This means the artworks can be easily turned around while I work. And if I want to move the work and table around my workshop, I just lift up one side and roll it around on the trolley's two wheels.

To do small jobs, I just put a sitting stool of suitable height on top of the trolley and next put a small lazy-susan on top. To sit down to work, I sit on a bar stool. See my next picture below.

This Ikea kitchen trolley costs me only US$80.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	SculptingTable1.JPG
Views:	224
Size:	34.4 KB
ID:	2976  Click image for larger version

Name:	SculptingTable2.JPG
Views:	237
Size:	35.2 KB
ID:	2977  
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 04-19-2006, 11:46 AM
grommet grommet is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 4,279
Re: Practical Problem Solving

plastic beverage bottle with the bottom cut off for the funnel, sandpaper for manicure.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 04-21-2006, 11:05 PM
Merlion's Avatar
Merlion Merlion is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Singapore
Posts: 3,716
Re: Practical Problem Solving

One simple trick, perhaps some of you are doing it, is about cutting and slicing clay. For this purpose, I use lengths of nylon fishing line instead of the stainless steel thread with handles sold in art material shops.

Quote:
Originally Posted by grommet
plastic beverage bottle with the bottom cut off for the funnel,
Thanks. Surprising, this idea never occurs to me, as somehow, I have the age old habit of throwing the empties away. I should start saving some now.

Quote:
sandpaper for manicure.
I don't quite follow what do you mean.

Last edited by Merlion : 04-22-2006 at 04:02 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 04-22-2006, 02:22 PM
grommet grommet is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 4,279
Re: Practical Problem Solving

Quote:
I don't quite follow what do you mean.
fingernails get caught/ torn in the process of making art... sandpaper works for smoothing off the edges of these "tools"
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 05-04-2006, 03:10 AM
Hallac Hallac is offline
Level 1 user
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 7
Re: Practical Problem Solving

'They' make a small half funnel/extended lip out of plastic that snaps inside the can lip/groove. It allows you to poor with total percision and not a drop of paint on the can. When the can is sitting, the excess paint rolls back into the can for the next time. Best thing since toilet paper if you ask me. When you remove it, it cleans up extremely easy AND there isn't a single drop of paint in the lid groove thingie! Great for a good lasting seal! Your material is most likely thicker, but it would still work just as well. Should be able to pick them up at a Hardware store Like Ace, Home Depot or Lowes. They're usually about c.50 to c.80 each - and come in a bunch of colors woohoo!! Might try a paint store, I see them all the time and usually buy a handful when I think about it. Ocassionally I see more sophisticated versions but if you ask me the simple ones allow more control and are a piece of cake to clean. If you can't find them let me know - I'm out and about all the time and will gladly find you a source. And if that doesn't work for yuh, I'd suggest purchasing a turkey baster, Ha. Cheers.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 05-25-2006, 02:16 PM
brooker882 brooker882 is offline
Level 1 user
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: illinois
Posts: 4
Re: Practical Problem Solving

Quote:
Originally Posted by Merlion
We sculptors are practical people, and from time to time we have to solve unusual practical problems big or small. I thought it would be useful if we can share our experience with others.

Here is one I tackled this morning.

I recently bought some liquid epoxy from my supplier and wanted to try it out in a small quantity. Unfortunately the epoxy resin and hardener both come in 2.5 kg (5 lb) open-top tins (or cans) that is hard to pour without making a mess. I thought of transfering them into my spare 5 kg (10 lb) plastic containers with a smaller opening, but I need funnels. Of course if I use a funnel for say the epoxy resin, I need to clean it very well before I can reuse it for the hardener, and this is quite troublesome.

At this stage, I do wish I have disposable funnels. I looked around, and notice many thin plastic disposable cups.

To cut the explanation short, I hope the photo below can show how I solved the problem. One thing the photo cannot show. I had to cut a hole at the bottom of the cup, about 1/2 in diam.
Dear Merlion,

I have found a product that would solve your disposable funnel problem. The product is called "Fast Funnel" and I discovered it in Wal-mart when I was searching for some supplies for a sculpture class I took last spring. It comes in several sizes and cost between $1.50-$3.00 for a pack of three. I found the fast funnel to be helpful because it eliminated any cross contaminaton and I didnt have to clean anything up. The Drains in my class room would often clog because people would rinse out their funnels and the excess product would fill the drain. With the fast funnel we would just throw it away after using it and then just tear off a new one.
You can find more information on their website:

http://fastfunnel.com/index.htm
hope this helps you out!
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 05-25-2006, 10:14 PM
Stevem Stevem is offline
ISC Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Marietta, GA
Posts: 228
Re: Practical Problem Solving

I found a pretty cool little thing. I was recently commisioned to do fourty little desk sculptures for a company and needed some letters to word the pieces with. The letters needed to be around a quarter of an inch tall so I used pasta, alphabet letters from the grocery store. I laid them out on my sculpt and made a mold right over the top of them. They turned out beautiful.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 05-25-2006, 11:03 PM
KeithBentley KeithBentley is offline
Level 4 user
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Toronto
Posts: 63
Re: Practical Problem Solving

You may want to look into another type of epoxy.
I've never seen the cans you speak of - I buy 'west system' and there is a pump system that screws onto the top. One pump of resin to one pump of hardener. It's safe, easy, and no clean up aside from your mixing bowl.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 05-26-2006, 11:34 PM
Merlion's Avatar
Merlion Merlion is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Singapore
Posts: 3,716
Re: Practical Problem Solving

Quote:
Originally Posted by brooker882
Dear Merlion, I have found a product that would solve your disposable funnel problem. The product is called "Fast Funnel" and I discovered it in Wal-mart when I was searching for some supplies for a sculpture class I took last spring.
Thanks for your suggestion. I understand Mal-mart has gone to many countries, but suprisingly it has not come to Singapore. (on the other hand, Ikea the big global furniture chain, is here.)

Earlier on somebody suggested cutting off the tops of disposable plastic bottles for mineral water or soft drinks. This works unless we need funnels for containers with very small openings.
__________________
Merlion
www.onesunartist.com
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 05-26-2006, 11:52 PM
Merlion's Avatar
Merlion Merlion is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Singapore
Posts: 3,716
Re: Practical Problem Solving

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stevem
I found a pretty cool little thing. I was recently commisioned to do fourty little desk sculptures for a company and needed some letters to word the pieces with. The letters needed to be around a quarter of an inch tall so I used pasta, alphabet letters from the grocery store. I laid them out on my sculpt and made a mold right over the top of them. They turned out beautiful.
Yes, this is a real cool practical idea. Thanks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KeithBentley
You may want to look into another type of epoxy.
I've never seen the cans you speak of - I buy 'west system' and there is a pump system that screws onto the top. One pump of resin to one pump of hardener. It's safe, easy, and no clean up aside from your mixing bowl.
Unfortunately we don't have in Singapore such resin suppliers that cater for the convenience of individual small-user customers. The stockist suppliers here cater only to manufacturers that use resins in larger quantities, hence in large tin containers. In this respect sculptors here suffer as our community here is small.
__________________
Merlion
www.onesunartist.com
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 06-08-2006, 02:41 PM
brooker882 brooker882 is offline
Level 1 user
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: illinois
Posts: 4
Re: Practical Problem Solving

Quote:
Originally Posted by Merlion
Thanks for your suggestion. I understand Mal-mart has gone to many countries, but suprisingly it has not come to Singapore. (on the other hand, Ikea the big global furniture chain, is here.)

Earlier on somebody suggested cutting off the tops of disposable plastic bottles for mineral water or soft drinks. This works unless we need funnels for containers with very small openings.

wow i didnt know that you lived in Singapore!! that is unfortunate that most of the distributors of the product are in the U.S. however i e-mailed the company and they said that they have 2 mail order companies that supply the product...but they are not sure if they ship internationally you would have to check that out on their websites :

This is the link that describes shipping for white horse that distributes the product
http://www.whitehorsepress.com/shipping.php

and this is the link on whitehorse that has how much the product costs

http://www.whitehorsepress.com/shopp...tion=1&sort=2a

the second company is west marine and they ship internationally maybe they will ship to Singapore for cheaper you would have to check

http://www.westmarine.com/webapp/wcs...lish&sect=care

http://www.westmarine.com/webapp/wcs...y=OrderItemAdd



hopefully this helps you if you are still interested in this product i found it to be really handy and it saves so much time and hassle!

hope the weather is beautiful over there!

-brooke, chicago IL
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 06-08-2006, 08:02 PM
PAULHT PAULHT is offline
Level 3 user
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: JERUSALEM, ISRAEL
Posts: 38
Re: Practical Problem Solving

My favourite/multi use tool, wooden sticks for Bar-BQs- good for everything from modelling to mixing/applying glues. (plentiful here in the Holy Land).
My biggest "want" issue -small pots for mixing small ammounts of plaster, maybe plastic egg boxes- (not so plentiful here in the Holy Land).
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 06-20-2006, 08:34 PM
philpraxis's Avatar
philpraxis philpraxis is offline
Level 8 user
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Paris
Posts: 230
Re: Practical Problem Solving

My useful stuff:
- big storage tanks (40 L) with lid: ask your pastry / bread maker (boulangerie), they get their material in these tanks and throw them away afterwards
- form sustaining material for clay sculpture: sawdust in plastic bags
- way to get some dry clay to mix and dry in a good way: put in a plastic bag, add water, let it dry to desired softness/hardness which can be test through plastic without having dirty fingers

__________________
http://www.xlrmx.org
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 09-03-2007, 01:26 PM
zazie's Avatar
zazie zazie is offline
Level 7 user
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: California
Posts: 173
Re: Practical Problem Solving

hello there -

I would appreciate your suggestions about solving my problem

The plot:
My sculptures weight around 35 lbs. I have a very small studio with 2 parallel counters 37 inch high, and in between a kitchen trolley on casters topped with a small taboret, itself topped with a lazy susan, all from Ikea and copied from Merlion's excellent own set up as described in this thread (dear Merlion). I work on at least three pieces at a time. I really love this set up but...

The problem:
I do need to move the pieces around from counter to kitchen cart and then take them down to the drying spot not far from the tiny studio. My back is screaming "no more."

The solution?
I am considering buying a "portable" lift table to not only move the pieces around but also to be used as a sculpting table. The 200lb lift model below seems the right solution though it comes in pieces and that worries me.

http://www.materialflow.com/Wesco-Lo...ioners.htm#VLT

Any suggestions about which brand, model, or other solutions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks.
ZZ
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 09-03-2007, 02:21 PM
jOe~'s Avatar
jOe~ jOe~ is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Spokane, Wa
Posts: 3,190
Re: Practical Problem Solving

Zazie look at these: http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=94822

www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=41145

they might work for you and cost less.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 09-03-2007, 03:42 PM
zazie's Avatar
zazie zazie is offline
Level 7 user
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: California
Posts: 173
Re: Practical Problem Solving

Thank you Joe~ for your response.

I did consider such models you suggested but the drawbacks were:
- maximum height was less than 30 inches (I need at least 37 inch)
- the handle would be in the way of rotating the lazy susan when working on a piece (my tiny studio requires the table to do double duty, to serve as a sculpting table)


I saw some other portable lift tables similar to the one I linked in my previous message (i.e., no handle, minimum design such as a pole and a platform).

As this should be quite an investment I want to buy the right make and I have no idea how sturdy, and durable those things are and who are the reliable makers, so price is most certainly a consideration but long term quality is crucial.

I would assume that many sculptors here need this kind of contraption?

Thanks, ZZ
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 09-04-2007, 07:58 AM
tonofelephant's Avatar
tonofelephant tonofelephant is offline
ISC Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Martinsburg, WV
Posts: 724
Re: Practical Problem Solving

Zazie,

You found a wonderful solution to your situation. I have had a WESCO hydralic lift similar to the Lite Lift and love it. It has been a godsend for delivering heavy stone sculptures, unloading trucks, and also as a photostand. As a photostand with a background - it is superb.

The WESCO has stood up to my abuse, and kept running. I love it. Best wedding anniversary gift I ever got. I got my lift at WW Grainger - not the cheapest company but they at least had it in time for the anniversary.

Besides $400 is cheap to save your back so you can work better, longer. Get the new toy and don't think twice.

Carl
www.wsggallery.com
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 09-04-2007, 08:26 AM
ironman ironman is offline
ISC Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Silver City, New Mexico
Posts: 1,603
Re: Practical Problem Solving

Hi, To those who experience back problems, if when you start to lift, you tilt your head back and look UP TOWARDS THE CEILING, it immediately straightens your back out, lowers your butt and center of gravity, forcing you to lift with your legs. Therefore, no bad back!
Any old weightlifter could tell you this.
I'm 60 and I've only had one bad back in my lifetime and it didn't happen when I did the 600 lb. deadlift (I weighed 160) in the gym.
I think problem solving is one definition of what every artist does every day with everything. We are constantly solving all these little problems, put some clay on here, take some clay off there, it still doesn't look right, look some more, add clay in a different spot, aha, that works. Just a small example of what I'm talking about.
Have a great day,
Jeff
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 09-04-2007, 08:31 AM
evaldart's Avatar
evaldart evaldart is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: easthampton, massachusetts
Posts: 5,637
Re: Practical Problem Solving

Wow Ironman, Damn near quadruple bodywieght deadlift...only a hand full of those have ever been accomplished. Amazing. I hit 660 once but clocked in at 240 when I did it. Not nearly as impressive.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 09-04-2007, 08:45 AM
ironman ironman is offline
ISC Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Silver City, New Mexico
Posts: 1,603
Re: Practical Problem Solving

Hi Evaldart, Yeah, and I was the only one in the gym who could get it more than an inch off the floor. That included a Jr. Mr. America and other assorted behemoths all of them, much bigger than me.
by the way, I never attempted anything heavier and have no doubt 640 would have been within reach at that time. None of us ever thought about it!
Have a great day,
Jeff
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 09-04-2007, 01:45 PM
zazie's Avatar
zazie zazie is offline
Level 7 user
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: California
Posts: 173
Re: Practical Problem Solving

Thank you all for taking the time to follow-up and for your suggestions. Ironman I shall try to practice the pose you describe when lifting weight - you know what you are talking about!

Indeed, the weighlifting abilities of some of our members are most impressive (and I shall remember that when I need a strong arm).

Trusting Tonofelephant that Wesco is a good brand, I am planning to purchase the 200lbs version at $231 (see the website I referenced earlier). This lift table is on casters, weighs 73lbs, and is plenty enough for me as I do not plan to produce pieces heavier than 50lbs. It has a foot pedal and when used as a sculpting table I will be able to move it up and down (just as the hairdresser does) and this will be very convenient to work on different parts of a body. Right now I have to sit on the 37 inch counter next to my piece to work on an upturned face. (i do not believe in working the head detached from the body)

Anyway, I will surf a bit to see if there are better deals.

I am hoping I'll be able to keep my Merlion set up as it is a really convenient means to work standing up or sitting with feet up the lower shelves.

Cheers and thank you,
ZZ
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


Sculpture Community, Sculpture.net
International Sculpture Center, Sculpture.org
vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Russ RuBert