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  #26  
Old 03-25-2006, 04:19 PM
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iowasculptor iowasculptor is offline
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Re: Is bodycasting really art?

Its not that I don't think you should fight for what you believe its just you nned to know what you are fighting for. Should people who make cast be banned from every art establisment? What is your desired outcome of this discussion? I respect the craft of creating art, but I also realize that the boundaries of art extend infinately in all directions. If I make a statement about something as "not art" then I limit the field of possibilities. In the post-post modern art world we live in, setting boundaries causes many problems. There are many opinions about what art is, this is good, what other area of influence can you have the diversity that exists in art? Again I ask what is your intent in defining casting vs carving or craft? I don't evaluate a work of art based solely on technical merit, while I may say, wow that is really skillfully done, I do not necessarily consider it a good piece of art without a well composed and thought out concept that expands my understanding of the world. Skill is important but not all, if that was the case then we wouldn't learn the visual language that conveys meanings in art. "Semiotics" Anyway I try to focus my energies on things that I can control, and frannkly you can only control what you do, not what other do. You probably can't change thier opinions either, and personally I wouldn't want to on this one. There are far more serious concerns pressing the art culture of this country than how something is made.
Matt
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  #27  
Old 03-26-2006, 02:37 AM
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JasonGillespie JasonGillespie is offline
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Re: Is bodycasting really art?

Iowasculptor,
I stated at the outset of the thread my intention behind initially asking this question. I have one view point regarding body casting...which was negative... and was wanting to hear a plausible affirmative case for it. Most of what has gone on in between has been that discussion. Until now most of what I have heard is a defense based not on the validity of the technique...excepting a few good points...the majority have taken the form of an indirect defense which has consisted of bringing up the fact that we should have a "broader view" of art. Your comments fit into this same group and that's ok. As you say, we are in the "MTV" generation.

It is a forgone conclusion that many people are heavily invested in supporting as open and politically correct a view of art as possible. It fits into the prevailing modernist/post-modernist ideology about art....namely that our acceptance of anything as art must be good because the opposite, making judgements about what is good and what isn't, is bad. I cheerfully and logically disagree, but I seldom follow the well trodden path. I find it is much more fun to make your own.

As for your comments about not changing things...well....nevermind.


Grommet,
You are most certainly right about people having different artistic needs. That is the wonderful thing about art. People are free to pursue their own personal visions and that makes for a richer tapestry.
Whether or not something is wrong is in the eye of the beholder, that has always been the case. It is the tug of war between ideas that keeps art vibrant. Without dissent there is no friction...nothing to react to. Without opposing ideas we would live in the artistic equivalent of ancient Egypt....an art that remains unchanged for thousands of years.

Last edited by JasonGillespie : 03-26-2006 at 02:52 AM.
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  #28  
Old 03-26-2006, 05:24 AM
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Merlion Merlion is offline
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Re: Is bodycasting really art?

Bodycasting is of course a technique used in creating art. It is by itself not art.

But as bodycasting can produce visually stunning results, a good artist can make use of it to produce visually beautiful, and sometimes powerful works of art that people enjoy viewing.

On the other hand, another artist can make use of it and produce a bad work of art that people dislike viewing.

And some artist may be tempted to do bodycasting and pass the result off as hand sculpting work.

Last edited by Merlion : 03-26-2006 at 10:18 AM.
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  #29  
Old 03-26-2006, 09:36 AM
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Re: Is bodycasting really art?

Jason,
I agree with you that hand sculpted works lend themselves to more expression and interpretation than cast pieces, I see casting as just another media to make sculpture, like cardboard, hair, etc. I haven't used this method personally mostly because my work is not about the sculptured figure, a planar version works just fine for my purposes. Take a look at Tom Friedman, construction paper splat, not that that is casting but it does show the wide range of media used to convey thoughts. His piece is a life size portrait of himself hitting the ground after a very high fall. This piece is very powerful and I contend that it is made in the best media possible. I think that I said that casting in itself is not art, but neither is nocking off some stone or slapping some clay together, so as a criteria to define art I don't think it works. There are always exceptions once you make parameters. Look at the artists who we now revere, Duchamp for example had the "not art" label put on his work but now we look at his contribution to the art world and it is unbelievable. He didn't even cast his work he just found it and placed it. Whether you like him or not is irrelivant in the scope of his importance to the world of art. I would challenge you that if you feel so strongly about this issue that you incorporate it into your work. This push and pull could make some interesting pieces and may lead to a pretty nice Thesis. This is the type of advice I give my students, if they are passionate about something then they should explore the opposite so that they can become authorities on the subject. I can see some really nice figures coming out part cast and part carved/sculpted. This might be a nice way for you to work this out and impact the art world. In this way people from various points of view will be allowed access into your world.
Good luck
matt
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  #30  
Old 03-26-2006, 04:59 PM
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Re: Is bodycasting really art?

Iowasculptor,

Duchamp's use of preexisting objects as art, as well as subsequent sculptors use of such materials, however, hinges upon an entirely different premise than bodycasting. There is a problem when this distinction isn't made clear.

Found objects and their use is a statement about the artistic value of everyday items. It ingeniously draws its strength from the idea that the design value any of these objects might have on their own and makes them somehow worthy to be considered as objects of art when used in certain contexts. Now whether or not you buy into that idea remains to be seen, but it is not an idea that supports bodycasting and placing the two in the same category is a mistake.


Merlion,

Your initial statement rings true. Simply put, bodycasting is a technique. Then you add the important, "It is by itself not art." That is the kernel of why I then disagree with your next statement that, " a good artist can make use of it to produce visually beautiful, and sometimes powerful works of art." It is the essence of what figurative sculpture is that precludes bodycasting from being a component in making art.


Figurative sculpture, regardless of its message, on a fundamental level is about a created illusion. Period. It is an illusionistic construct that resides in realtime, three-dimensional space and is based around a sculptural idea. (This is where people get into trouble thinking sculpture is just objects or material put together in an interesting fashion...as if it is that simple) Figurative sculpture doesn't have to be realistically modeled, it can be a highly subjective, personal interpretation made in any number of media and processes. But all of these interpretations will be built on the common premise of an artistic illusion that becomes a sculptural idea by virtue of the artist skillfully manipulating his/her chosen medium.

Not so bodycasting. It is in no way an artistic element. By its very nature it can't be. It has no intrinsic artistic merit as an object.....as we have prescribed to preexisting found objects or objects skillfully rendered. (I keep beating this drum but it is due to the importance of the idea) Bodycasting is a short cut taken to escape the task of creating an artful object oneself. Including it with other sculptural elements will not give it value, rather it will negate the value of the surrounding elements by virtue of its artlessness.

But that is as I see it.
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  #31  
Old 03-26-2006, 07:09 PM
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Re: Is bodycasting really art?

To say that Segal’s or Hanson’s work are not about the figure
is like saying that
air travel is not about airplanes
or
capitalism is not about money
the figure is a key feature and cannot be so lightly discounted
one could as readily argue that my ISIS is not about the figure
that may be true-especially when considering OSIRIS and HORUS
I would say that the sculpture uses the figure

As I said earlier, it boils down to ones goals
Matt rightly pointed out that it is a time consuming passion with little monetary reward
In the “real world” if money is the goal, then by all means, bastardize the art by using cast from life figures, bastardize the language by calling taxidermy art or sculpture(I think it is neither)…do whatever it takes to find shortcuts and go for the fast buck

I think Blake hit the key as to why I would eschew casting from life
I am not into photorealism.
Everything I do from housing/habitat/landscape designs to woodworking and sculpting is done to serve an aesthetic.
I have rarely found a model who fulfills my ideal, so in any given sculpture, I’ll use bodyparts from different models, or my own vision---and for stability, the wrists and ankles are usually a tad thicker than human.
Even though I eschew casting from life, I have taken it as a compliment when accused of this…most recently from a museum curator as/re ISIS, so I helped her up on the tailgate of the truck and pointed out that her arms were too short(done so the tilt of the arms would mimic the slope of the entrance to an Egyptian temple) and other variations from life.
So I take license to modify the parts of the body when it suits the aesthetic vision.
It took years of work to hne in to the figure so that I could use the parts I want to clearly share my vision while maintaining the veneer of reality.
I think that the art suffers from academics who would discard the differences between what Blake defined as high and low art, and from wordsmiths who misuse the language.

A local woodcarver, Bill Schnute used to borrow stuffed animals from a local taxidermist to use as models for his carvings. They don’t complain, they don’t squirm about, they can hold a pose just about forever, and their a tad less macabre than using the folks in the morgue.
I think of casting from life as a tool, and as such it is a very limiting tool. Which constrains the product, while real sculpting frees the vision and the soul.

But then again, I’m poor and old and acknowledge that my arguments are specious to my attitudes.

Whither hence?
Rod
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  #32  
Old 03-26-2006, 09:26 PM
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Re: Is bodycasting really art?

Quote:
I think of casting from life as a tool, and as such it is a very limiting tool. Which constrains the product, while real sculpting frees the vision and the soul.
At this point I'd like you to consider that perhaps this is one tool / material we haven't learned to fully utilize yet. Stone chisels each have their own mark and use, clay is recognizeable for its flowing malleability, metal for its self supporting rigidity, fibers for their tactile quality as well as their familiarity. Bodycasting reproduces in unflinching detail every soft curve and annoying imperfection. So you've got a mold. You're only limited by your own creativity as to what fills that mold or how it's manipulated.
Take a detour Jason; do what the Prof. says & explore the other side (the dark side? ), your own work will benefit from the investigation. Don't just think about it, DO it.
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  #33  
Old 03-28-2006, 01:26 AM
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Re: Is bodycasting really art?

grommet,

I'm sorry to say I won't be trying any bodycasting...not out of obstinancy, but just plain old lack of interest. It isn't something I have any faith in and to use it ...even as an experiment....would run counter to everything I believe in. Those who use may do so with impunity...but I will not. It does not fit into my plans. And at my age you know what you want to do and that is what I need to be doing. Not to mention I've already spent the last 20+ years working in a different medium. Time's a wasting.

Sculptor,
You are right..it is one's goals that will dictate your choice of techniques, materials, etc.... My choice is to get even better at rendering the body myself so I can give voice to my ideas in a more powerful way just as someone who bodycasts is to avoid having to worry with the time consuming..and to them ..the unnecessary task of creating a believable figure by hand. To each their own...as long as I do not have to consider it art.
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  #34  
Old 03-28-2006, 05:20 PM
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Re: Is bodycasting really art?

Wow! It's amazing what's come out in this thread since I last was able to visit. 33 posts to date!

We've had debates on issues of this sort before, and I'm happy to see that this one is being conducted with mutual respect for the divergent and strongly held opinions that have surfaced. At the same time, I have to wonder where this is going, beyond repetition.

Certainly, I long ago wrote off the "Art World's" pontifications about value in art. To me, a work of art, let's say sculpture in this thread, carries its own value, and it either will or won't express that value to a given observer.

That conclusion is verified through comments made here, some people praising works by well-known sculptors, and others rejecting the same. Maybe we all should take a deep breath and wait a day or two before continuing, to see if we really have new things to say.

(And, not to be provocative, but I can't let the reference to thermodymanics above go unremarked. My longest professional career was in physical chemistry, and thermodymamics is a big part of that. Entropy or disorder in a physical system, such as this Earth, in no way demonstrates design in its formation.)
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  #35  
Old 03-29-2006, 06:46 AM
grommet grommet is offline
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Re: Is bodycasting really art?

Congratulations Jason, you have remained unmoved. Your focus is admirable.
So, I'm thinking this is the kernel of a fun undergrad segment for sculpture exploratory. As a group come up with a list of "unworthy" processes, mediums, etc. The challenge, of course, is to prove the list wrong. My only question is ... how big could you possibly make a Chia sculpture depicting the protest of the more strict immigration laws?
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  #36  
Old 03-30-2006, 01:36 AM
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Re: Is bodycasting really art?

Grommet,
Actually it is not not about being unmoved so much as it is being committed to an idea...at least until a better idea is intoduced and proven. A personal truth is something that is not of value until it is tested by the fire of controversy.....and.....An opinion is a belief that has never been tested. I want to know my opinions can withstand scrutiny and be personal truths I am not ashamed to hold. If they don't then I need to discard them.

I don't know if any process is unworthy so long as someone finds merit in its use...this is my stint as devil's advocate. I do understand that those who use bodycasting do so....some anyway....from a genuine need. To them it is worth using and that is their reality. Just as realistic figuration is mine. My process is to some artists...I know...outdated...oldfashioned...passe..etc... We each consider our individual processes worthy. There is no real proving them wrong because each person subscribes to the circular reasoning that upholds their use of that particular process. How can you disprove the worth of some thing that exists outside your circle of reasoning in the first place? My arguments against bodycasting are specious beyond my particular way of seeing. As are yours and anyone elses. (The question is can you see the paradox in the above two paragraphs?)

It would have to be as big as the Chia representing the wanton breaking of our country's already existing immigration laws by the thousands of illegals streaming across the border on a daily basis and many citizen's lack of concern for the damage it is doing to our economic and societal stability.



Fritchie,
Yes, redundancy has crept into this thread. Due in part to some of the same questions being posed after already being asked and answered. I know for my part that I followed up some posts tenaciously to see if there was more to the opinion than merely knee-jerk reaction.

My interest in asking the question in the first place was not just to get responses on a general level....I was also intested to see if anyone had a logical refutation of my argument. This whole line of inquiry stems from some of the very well thought out debates we have had in seminar courses here at the academy. Obviously everyone here at NYAA is figurative on some level. That makes for less radical departures of thought in discussions...though they can be quite interesting nonetheless. In the arena of this online community,where a great diversity of thought exists, I assumed the question would spark greater debate...which it did. What I didn't expect was the degree to which people's affirmation or negation of bodycasting depended upon a larger view of what art is and that this would displace the original question as a point for discussion. I was very intrigued that for some sculptors'.....bodycasting being art wasn't viewed as a separate issue... it was an automatic response connected to that larger philosophy. My lack of acceptance of it was connected to my larger view of art as well but I was still willing to consider it in sculptural terms alone.
That we base our smallest opinions/beliefs about art on a much greater understanding/viewpoint is logical, but one that was interesting to me in that it divided down "party lines" so nicely. How far are we willing to go to defend our respective belief systems? How well defined are these beliefs? How well thought out are they? The thread could have easily been a fill in the blank question...."is ____ really art?" Take your pick of subjects that are hot buttons connected to an individual's way of thinking about art. And with all the dogma of a religion. A contrast of thoughts and feelings that speaks volumes about our respective positions in the art world and where we think it should go.


That being said....there is an element of talking at each other rather than to each other that I have noticed and probably makes your suggestion a valid one. It may very well be the end of the thread. Although, I would be interested in your own well thought out view...pro or con.







As to the scientific aside..The lecture I went to (in undergraduate days) was not about entropy/disorder being a sign of design, rather that the existence of life, which is complexity personified, happening at all reflects an order being imposed upon a system that can only become less ordered not more. When I questioned the gentleman later about this....he clarified for me the application of the second law to the creation of the universe...life on earth...etc... I've since read/researched a little on it from a layman's perspective and according to some.....the complex evolution of life on earth and the increasing entropy of the universe do not point to random chance accounting for the second law being suddenly flouted so we could evolve from single celled organisms. Obviously this is one view within the scientific community, but the logic seems straightforward to me. No doubt it won't to others.
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  #37  
Old 03-30-2006, 08:40 AM
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Re: Is bodycasting really art?

Thanks for taking the pause I suggested. I have no difficulties with anything to date in this thread, though some in the past have gotten so contentious they have had to be terminated by a moderator. Everyone here has been commendable for good expression and consideration of differences.

Let me go to some of your points. "What I didn't expect was the degree to which people's affirmation or negation of bodycasting depended upon a larger view of what art is and that this would displace the original question as a point for discussion. I was very intrigued that for some sculptors '..... bodycasting being art wasn't viewed as a separate issue ... it was an automatic response connected to that larger philosophy. My lack of acceptance of it was connected to my larger view of art as well but I was still willing to consider it in sculptural terms alone."

This actually is a logical response by other people to your question, though clearly not the perspective you sought. The whole definition of Art (or Sculpture) is changing rapidly today, just like the options and rules of life in general. When people think of installations, ephemeral art, art made primarily from fabric, wire, broken wood or other materials (even dead animals or animal products), it is natural and even necessary for a given artist to place his/her own ideas in a wider context. As I expressed earlier, I have not used bodycasts in my own work, but I see nothing wrong with their use by others.

What I think what you may getting at here is the essence of sculpture - something along the lines of "expressive and coherent 3D imagery". In your case, this is imagery of the human figure. For many others today, the human figure is minor or even unnecessary. Forgive me for putting words in your mouth, but you probably hoped to confine the issue to something like "What is the proper role of bodycasting in figurative sculpture?" Even with that limitation, I suspect others will say it's OK, and even fine. I think that way myself. Also, as I said in my first post, you have opened a broad topic, even with these limitations, so I'll stop here a bit arbitrarily.

With respect to your additional comments on thermodynamics, that earlier scientist overlooks one of the basic requirements. The law about entropy requires an isolated system, one with no inflow or outflow of matter or of energy, such as heat. Life on Earth required a heat source for its origination, and it requires heat for continuation. To make a quick point - ice certainly is more ordered than water (ice has lower entropy than water), but it forms without difficulty each time the temperature is lowered, or heat flows away from it. That in brief is the error of the original statement.
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  #38  
Old 03-31-2006, 12:37 AM
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Re: Is bodycasting really art?

Fritchie,
your remark about the thermodynamic question oversimplifies the point. It is not a random few scientists who can not agree when a system is closed, how large the closed system is, or whether or not it can even be considered closed at all. Too, the different uses/meanings given to entropy (logical, configurational...) further create confusion within the scientific community...it is no more harmonious than the art world. Some scientists argue that thermodynamics has little to do with entropy as applied to biological systems...but some disagree. Suffice it to say, until a consensus is reached....there will be no sure or certain answer only many assertions.

As to your comments about the thread...I was simply looking to see if a logical rationale supporting the use of bodycasting would be put forward. Yes, those that hold to the post-modern idea of avant gardism figuration isn't the thing. But that doesn't free one from having to consider the idea. I do not personally create non-objective work, but I certainly have spent more than a little time considering what makes it good or how it functions because it is art my own work must coexist and to some degree compete with. My observation is that some of those that have given blanket acceptance to bodycasting as a viable form haven't actually taken time to consider whether or not it functions within the context of figuraton. That figuration isn't their bag is no excuse for an artist to be unaware of what is happening in other areas of the art world....or to be unable to understand something outside the context of their own creative sphere. You are right in saying it was a broad topic...still the applications are specific enough. Fini.

Have a good weekend.

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  #39  
Old 03-31-2006, 02:34 AM
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Re: Is bodycasting really art?

You will forgive me if I make one more comment on this subject in respect of the development of figuration in sculpture and thus the use of body casting. I will leave the two of you to the debate concerning thermodynamics and entropy.

Considering the place of figurative sculpture in terms of the development of art, one should admit that the “Classical representational” figure is done and the abstract figure has also pretty well been exhausted. In order that figurative sculpture somehow move forward into this new century, perhaps body-casting represents a way to further develop this art.
In terms of avant gardism post post modern figuration and giving consideration to the tendency in art today to include an obligation towards originality, an artist, in order to explore new ways either to present or to represent the figure requires that any restriction concerning the aesthetic or technical handling of the figure be forgiven. In this context the use of body casting could be considered both appropriate and necessary.
In order to move the art of figurative sculpture forward the old traditional sculptors like myself need to try to promote the new and daring use of the figure without bias as to the manner inwhich the art is constructed.
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  #40  
Old 03-31-2006, 07:45 AM
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Re: Is bodycasting really art?

I believe the "direct" sculpting of the figure is a "spiritual" experience with a deep connection between the visual, tactile, and emotional elements.

Without the knowledge of the elements that makes up the animal form and the operation of these parts, how can one expect to produce a sculpture with emotional impact? Even of a human drapped in clothes!

Try to body cast someone holding a position driven to by deep sorrow or strenuous activity. Try to body cast a horse leaping over a fence or big cat lunging for a prey.

But with knowledge of bone, muscle, and flesh--and empathy which should drive any serious figurative artist--a sculptor can impart life into a static medium. And as for "style", this knowledge can only contribute to the achievement of great things.

And I add here from "The Sculptor's Way" by Brenda Putnam, first published in 1948...Chapter XI, Running Templates and Enlarging By Hand:

As this chapter concerns itself mostly with mechanical processes, it may be well here to say something about plaster casts made directly from the living, or dead, model. Although such casts can hardly be called "art", they may on occasion, prove of great assistance to the artist. A death mask, for instance, may be very useful to the sculptor who has the unfortunate task of making a posthumous portrait. Flesh forms, to be sure, will not be quite as they were in life, for they naturally drop away from the ridge of the face, but bony construction under them will be a valuable asset to the sculptor.

Just my views.

Argue all you want.

Good luck to all in all your endeavors.
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  #41  
Old 03-31-2006, 09:15 AM
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Re: Is bodycasting really art?

Is bodycasting really art?

No.

It is a mechanical process that replicates a natural object. It is not art and definitely not sculpture.
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Old 03-31-2006, 07:37 PM
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Re: Is bodycasting really art?

Quote:
Originally Posted by JasonGillespie
Fritchie,
your remark about the thermodynamic question oversimplifies the point. It is not a random few scientists who can not agree when a system is closed, how large the closed system is, or whether or not it can even be considered closed at all. Too, the different uses/meanings given to entropy (logical, configurational...) further create confusion within the scientific community...it is no more harmonious than the art world. Some scientists argue that thermodynamics has little to do with entropy as applied to biological systems...but some disagree. Suffice it to say, until a consensus is reached....there will be no sure or certain answer only many assertions.
I don't want this side discussion on entropy to take over the thread, but the Three Laws of Thermodymanics were formulated some time in the mid- to late-1800's and are a matter of pure logic, combined with astute observation. They are totally precise, and not in the least uncertain. Beginning in the early to mid 1900's, and continuing today, people have worked to extend these subjects to open systems, removing the restriction of no inflow or outflow of matter or energy. These extended "laws", really only tentative theories to date, are still under development, but that uncertainty is typical of a growing science. I have heard enough charlatans evoke "entropy" as "proof " of Creationism or Intelligent Design that I have been sensitized to this topic for a couple of decades. The comments are simple obfuscation, and I think we ought to consider this subject off limits in a thread on sculpture.
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  #43  
Old 04-02-2006, 05:42 PM
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Re: Is bodycasting really art?

When I went to college as a non-trad and graduated w/BFA sculpture from Univ of South Dakota, bodycasting was taught as a means to an end, a technique to build from, not for it's realistic qualities. Very few used the technique.

After I studied Segal, Neri, KiKi Smith & Rodin, taking it all in, I've created my own body of work utilitizing bodycastings.

Just because I use it for this body of work, doesn't mean cannot create a figure with another medium.

I invite you to see my website in connection with the SD Artists Network.
http://www.sdartists.net/members/dsundberg/index.php

Check it out, is it art or craft?
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  #44  
Old 04-02-2006, 09:47 PM
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Re: Is bodycasting really art?

Daylee - I looked at your site, and I think you use the technique very well. Your work definitely is in the "art" category for me. My main criterion, as I said earlier, is creativity or concept, well-executed.
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Old 04-04-2006, 05:58 PM
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Re: Is bodycasting really art?

as a somewhat well know lifecasting artist, with figures in museums, one in an airport, ect,. I will be honest. bodycasting/lifecasting is a tool and a bodycaster can be an artist.
Painting is just a tool, so is stone carving. it is a means to an ends.

Like painting, sculpting in clay, its a process. it would be like me asking if freeform sculpture is really art, i would think some would laugh some would be offended, others just would be indifferent. personally i dont like it, its not for me, but i can admit it is art, just not for me.

what you do with the castings, how they are arranged, painted ect is the artistic part (unless you have an art director they bleed all that out of you) but i believe some of my work is art, in fact i have gotten paid very well because someone considered it art. ( and before someone says that thats a sellout, if i dont make money i dont eat, and cant afford to do things i want to do) I highly promote selling out, otherwise burn your artwork when you are done so noone can buy it. truth be told if you are agiant "selling out" burn your Nikes, boycott starbucks, and ignore xmas. oops.

there are alot of people out there bodycasting lifecasting, but very few do it with the artistic ability needed to capture the moment in time trying to be captured. I equate it to norman rockwells ability to capture a moment in time, mabey he staged it but so what it comes across as a moment frozen. That is the art in bodycasting. now personally i could care less for unrealistic figures, i prefer the hyper realism or surrealism, but lets face it, its art, a tool, its what ever anyone wants it to be.

as far as ability, i seriously doubt that more than 10% of the sculptors on this thread could take a realistic body cast and make it work. The methods of proper casting are incredably hard to master, and the hardest part it to create a full figure that is seamless even under a magnifying glass, opening eyes, changing expressions, making sure that the neck position effects the forearm properly (and it does effect it) . I see that some people feel that this is not sculpting but i think it is either indifference (which is fine) or it could be sour grapes, lack of knowlege on how to use the tool of bodycasting when needed for the outcome of the project.
but like i said the tools are different thats all. Its mold making, sculpting, painting, its everything its more mixed media.



anyway a life/bodycaster is an artist. Is bodycasting art, well it depends on the critic.
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Last edited by realsculpt : 04-04-2006 at 06:10 PM.
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Old 04-05-2006, 10:47 AM
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Re: Is bodycasting really art?

Quote:
Originally Posted by realsculpt
The methods of proper casting are incredibly hard to master, and the hardest part is to create a full figure that is seamless even under a magnifying glass, opening eyes, changing expressions, making sure that the neck position effects the forearm properly (and it does effect it) .
This appears to me to make the results of a bodycast an armature--requiring artistic skill to build on in order to achieve the ultimate goal.

Thanks for the education!
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Old 04-05-2006, 01:07 PM
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Re: Is bodycasting really art?

I agree 100% ODDist, it is basically an armature. I think your perspective should please all involved in the thread.
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Old 04-27-2006, 01:38 PM
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Re: Is bodycasting really art?

This is quicksand! So am going to leap from one end to the other. The ability to draw exactly what one sees can be learnt if one has the aptitute. The ability to create a 3D figurative can be similiarly learnt. Over time one becomes skillful. Transalating this figurative into other medium can also be learnt. If the end is seen as the content, then in this example the means are the skill and the medium. This is the sacred ground of traditionalists. On this ground, having learnt to use the pen, alphabet, words, one is free to create prose or poetry. What you say and how you say it with the mediums you use matters.
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Old 06-24-2006, 11:24 AM
Keropian Keropian is offline
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Re: Is bodycasting really art?

Today the word art has been streched and diced to mean pretty much anything.
So whether a figure is lifecadt, photo-realistic, stylized or merely free form it could be considered art in todays society.

Life casting started when the cave man stepped into muck and saw his foot print.

I have seen some quite nice projects created with this life casting methods but in some cases when artist use it as a short cut to create a figure it falls short.

I have found the lifecaster Duane Hanson's workmanship interesting, but after the first impression of fooling the viewers eye it doesn't do much for me.

I enjoy following the forms of the body in clay and modeling and incorporating the human form in composition. I like the craft part of creating sculpture as well as the process. I'm not into fooling the eye per say just creating a fine figure. Each figure composition to me is a new challenge and I look forward to this and the solving the problems that come up.

Unfortunately in the world of making a living with art. I find there are way too many people on committees that don't know the difference between the many styles of figurative art or the difference between good and bad figurative art. With this in mind, my concern is for the craft person who may get sidelined by the new digital technology which can create a 3-d photo rendering of something without the need of a professional sculptor, merely someone to lay clay onto a surface and rake it. This to me is not fine art.

We all need to help educate our children and those in our community.

Mike
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Old 06-24-2006, 12:49 PM
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Landseer Landseer is offline
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Re: Is bodycasting really art?

I think body casting makes too realistic a sculpture since it's taken off the actual body, so then it almost takes on a store manniquin or wax museum look. With clay I like to see texture that LOOKS like it has been worked with small hand tools- not to see all those little cracks in the skin, pimples and hair roots on the surface- it then doesn't look like a sculpture.
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