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  #26  
Old 11-19-2006, 06:22 PM
glassgirl glassgirl is offline
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Re: Sculpting Stand (For wood sculpting)

anatomist1
That seems like what I envisioned in my mind. Did you build the one in the picture? Could you give me a bit more info, as to what the materials are, what the basic instructions for putting it together, and what possible costs might be?

classicalsculpt-- it seems like the one in the wet canvas site is a great stand, but without a vice or something to hold the wood, I don't see how it would work for my needs. I like the idea of making it myself, and not having to spend alot, so I'll continue to search and wait for ideas. Thanks for the link.
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  #27  
Old 11-19-2006, 10:10 PM
anatomist1 anatomist1 is offline
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Re: Sculpting Stand

I made the one in the picture. It now has a different, more adjustable vise on the top.

Making one of these is relatively easy for me, and should be for anyone who works with steel. It is basically just a plate, cut to fit the bottom of the vise, welded to a pipe. Another pipe, that the top's pipe fits within, has three legs welded to it. To hold the top one in place a hole is drilled into the base pipe and a nut welded there, into which a bolt with a welded t-handle is screwed. For a rotating top, another 3 or 4" length of big tube with a bolt/nut adjuster is added. The trick is figuring out a decent vise to use for the purpose, and deciding on a base diameter, if you aren't going to bolt it down. If you want to torque or pound on the object in the vise much, you'll need a bigger area of base than mine, which is about 2 feet. I only use mine for welding and light grinding.

Aside from the cost of the vise, the amount of steel for one of these things should only cost a few dollars. You might be able to find someone who fabricates steel to make one, and it should only take them an hour or two.

A very simple alternative would be to buy a wooden barstool and bolt a vise to the top of it... maybe use a couple of 2x4s to attach a 2 to 3 foot plywood disc to the bottom, which you could stand on while working to keep it from moving around. You wouldn't get spin or height adjustability though. I don't really see a sturdy, height adjustable model being made of wood without being huge and unweildy.
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  #28  
Old 11-28-2006, 05:50 AM
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Merlion Merlion is offline
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Re: Sculpting Stand

Thanks Zazie for making my day. I'm glad you like my pragmatic attempt to create a sturdy 'sculpture stand'.
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  #29  
Old 12-01-2006, 03:25 AM
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Merlion Merlion is offline
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Re: Sculpting Stand

Gosh! Zazie, the kitchen table from Ikea costs US$84 in Singapore, while you paid only $49 in California.

And Ikea in Singapore is not small, opening a second big outlet soon. Also, I understand it is owned by Ikea, not franchised as in most other countries.

They are making excessive profit out of us, perhaps for a lack of strong competitors like Wal-Mart.
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  #30  
Old 05-16-2007, 05:39 PM
amalgam amalgam is offline
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Re: Sculpting Stand

I wanted to resuscitate this thread to show the sculpting stand that I designed. I did not make plans, but it is pretty self-explanatory. I used a trailer jack and one 1/4HP electric motor that rotates both ways. I adapted a couple of pulleys, a v-belt, a couple of switches and some wood. In total I spent less that $80.00. It is very easy to make for those of you who want to built one like this. It goes from 30" to 45" tall.

Alfredo
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  #31  
Old 01-21-2008, 09:30 AM
stretchy54 stretchy54 is offline
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Re: Sculpting Stand

Wow! I'd like to build that stand. What specific model #s did you choose for the Bulldog jack & 1/4hp motor?
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  #32  
Old 01-27-2008, 10:51 PM
samdad samdad is offline
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Re: Sculpting Stand

Your SCULPTORS, make what you need.
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  #33  
Old 08-22-2008, 06:03 PM
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zazie zazie is offline
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Re: Sculpting Stand

The price of a sculpting table is just too much. A handy friend will build a sculpting stand for me but I have to get the material -

Anyone knows the name of those crank and where to order one (from a US company preferably) and with about 30" rise. The crank on the right seems especially good.

I already tried the Dutton -Lainson and other similar Marine tongue jacks, but those do not work for this purpose.

Also I'd like to have a hand crank rather than an electric one a previous message showed.

Thanks. Z
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  #34  
Old 09-04-2008, 03:15 PM
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hpaten hpaten is offline
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Re: Sculpting Stand

BMBourgoyne -

Yours is a serviceable solution. I've taken old 3-legged cast iron table bases (like the ones in cafes) and rigged them to pipes much like yours, tapped some holes in the side for stopping the rotation and drilled holes at a regular intervals for height adjustment. My problem is the darned flanges -- no one makes flat ones any more it seems to me. Have you run across this problem in your stands or is the levelness not that much of an issue to you perhaps? I find the levelness to be critical when working on anything symmetrical or figure work in general really.

Zazie -

Trailer jacks are definitely too wobbly as a main support, at least for my work. Please let me know if you find a source for the notched/screw type jack shown in those photos. I've scouted around for it recently as I am looking to build the same sort of stand and have noticed the same mechanism is used on some drill presses. Perhaps there's some replacement parts that can be ordered and outfitted for your purposes from a drill press vendor?
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  #35  
Old 09-15-2008, 11:53 PM
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marblecutter marblecutter is offline
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Re: Sculpting Stand

,,,,,Old Chair
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  #36  
Old 11-14-2008, 07:33 PM
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zazie zazie is offline
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Re: Sculpting Stand

For te past two years I wanted to build my own stand but after looking far and wide for a crank that suited my needs (thanks Hpaten and others for your input).... I decided finally to pay up and bought a sculpting stand with a hand crank - the stand adjusts from 33" to 50" and has a 24" top.

I bought the square top option instead of the round one to have more space to put my tools - now that I have used it for 2 days I find that choosing the square top was a good idea. The stand has lockable casters and can withstand 750 lbs - my bigger pieces are about 75 lbs.

The ability to move the piece up and down is a real must. Initially I used Merlion's solution (Ikea's cheap kitchen island with various props and a turntable) which is still an excellent solution for smaller pieces (see his message and pictures in this thread) but for my bigger pieces I used to climb on a stool to work on the head and crouch down to work on the feet. Now instead of focusing on the acrobatics I am more able to focus on viewing various angles from various heights.

This stand should last a life time. My studio is tiny so I took the pictures from outside.

The stand comes in 3 pieces easy to set up with basic tools, except for 2 side bars which are too hard to pull up, my husband is on a business trip so that has to wait. The packing is a bit of a mess and I had to claw at the foam to recycle the cardboard.

Two sites sell those cranks:
www.sculpturedepot.net and
www.arizonasculpture.com
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Last edited by zazie : 11-14-2008 at 07:57 PM.
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