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  #1  
Old 01-04-2009, 11:45 AM
trimm trimm is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Nebraska
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Parade float foam question

Hi, I am completley new to this. I want to make a parade float with a lightweight wood frame covered in a foam that I can sculpt down to the shape I need.

I think what I need is Polyurethane Pour Foam, but I am not sure. It is a dragon head and I will need to paint it as well.

Please get me on the right path here. What do I need and how do I use it...

Thanks

http://keithtrimm.com/
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  #2  
Old 01-04-2009, 12:37 PM
grommet grommet is offline
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Re: Parade float foam question

The non-professional one time use parade float stuff is typically a chickenwire adventure with paper mache or other covering. The 2 part foam stuff can get expensive. Yeah, you can carve detail into it, but you can also add detail onto paper mache forms with light cardboard.
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Old 01-06-2009, 11:05 AM
trimm trimm is offline
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Re: Parade float foam question

Quote:
Originally Posted by grommet View Post
The non-professional one time use parade float stuff is typically a chickenwire adventure with paper mache or other covering. The 2 part foam stuff can get expensive. Yeah, you can carve detail into it, but you can also add detail onto paper mache forms with light cardboard.
What is a paper mache form? I have made paper mache things in the past. I have wondered if I were to blend newsprint with flour and glue and pour it into a mold, would that work? But then trying to carve it would be tough.
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Old 01-06-2009, 11:33 AM
grommet grommet is offline
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Re: Parade float foam question

I don't mean form as in mold, I mean form as in basic shape to build out from. No sense in making a mold for a singular object like that. I see hotwire dude is online... have at.
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Old 01-06-2009, 01:59 PM
hotwired hotwired is offline
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Re: Parade float foam question

Here is how you can do it with EPS foam:
http://hotwirefoamfactory.com/custom...ino_forest.htm

Notice how he layered the foam? This uses less foam than carving into a big block, plus it is difficult to find big blocks of EPS foam. You can even use the 4" thick EPS insulation foam that is available at places like Home Depot.
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  #6  
Old 01-21-2009, 12:34 PM
halfbad halfbad is offline
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Re: Parade float foam question

Or, with a little luck and the right connection you go to your local foam roofing applicator and beg them to spray foam roofing material onto a basic wire mesh shape and carve/sand from there. Best to do this in their off season as often times their equipment is idle when they are not applying roofs. As is always the case it's a matter of that eternal equation; time + money + effort = finished art. At this point it comes down to how much of each of those factors do you have a surplus of and where does each fit with regard to the drop dead date, if there is one? The paper mache is lower cost, but takes a lot of effort and time. The eps is probably not only costly for a large volume, but takes a fair amount of effort and possibly some specialized tools as well. The sprayed foam may be more costly, but gets you a roughed out piece quickly-and it's fairly durable when done and will take ANYTHING as a top coat, unlike the eps which is sensitive to some solvents/glues/paints. At this point it is best to look at these criteria to come to a decision. Is this a temporary piece? Will it live outdoors? How often will it be moved, or is it a movable/moving piece? Is there a budget? Is there a time line? What kind of studio space will this be fabricated in? And finally, what is your skill level and how dedicated are you to learning new techniques to create this piece? Good luck!
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