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  #1  
Old 01-31-2005, 11:40 AM
thursday thursday is offline
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Big names in contemporary figurative sculpture

Hi all,

I'm a young Artist new to Sculpture.net and new to Sculpture in general.
I have a general question...
My interest is classical figurative work and I'm trying to get a handle on the industry as it is today.
What are the big names of contemporary figurative sculpture?
Are the Studios in Pietrasantra the best in the world?
I mean in a purely technical sense as in correct anatomy, traditional carving techniques & finish etc.
Outside of Italy, Christina Mikulasek seems to be one of the best.
http://www.mikulasek.com/
Is there many others still working in this vein?

I hope people will post a few names and that you'll all forgive my ignorance,

Thursday
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  #2  
Old 01-31-2005, 09:11 PM
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fritchie fritchie is offline
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Re: Big names in contemporary figurative sculpture

There's quite a range, and I'll take a bit of time later to post a few. Some have been mentioned in this forum, with web references. I did have problems with your Mikulasek link, though. All I got was a main page, with no apparent further links. Am I doing something wrong?
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  #3  
Old 02-01-2005, 05:10 AM
thursday thursday is offline
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Re: Big names in contemporary figurative sculpture

Thanks Fritchie,
Yes, it's a big topic!
I thought it would be interesting to see who different members "dream team" would consist of. I'm curious to see if there is a consensus in this particular type of sculpture.

That is odd about the Mikulasek link. At the bottom of the home page, there are buttons for the pages. Here's some direct links:
http://www.mikulasek.com/sculpture2.htm
http://www.mikulasek.com/portraiture.html

Thursday
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  #4  
Old 02-01-2005, 11:44 AM
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Re: Big names in contemporary figurative sculpture

Check out http://www.luigigalligani.it/

I believe every country is going to have it's own culturally inspired examples.
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  #5  
Old 04-21-2005, 01:56 PM
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JasonGillespie JasonGillespie is offline
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Re: Big names in contemporary figurative sculpture

Hello,
Someone you might want to take a look at is a sculptor by the name of Sabin Howard. (sabinhoward.com) He is very interesting and certainly working from a classical perspective. If Fredrick Hartt were still alive he would be one of the obvious choices, but his early death robbed the world of many great sculptures. Mikulasek is atually one of the people I would put at the medium level of ability. Look up a sculptor by the name of Hlavka. He is working at a very high level. Richard McDonald is definitely one of the best when it comes to sheer power and accuracy of the human form. Loveland, Colorado has many talented sculptors and I think the majority are figurative. If you spend some time on google, what I do, you can find a good number of really gifted sculptors to be inspired by.


A word of advice, from a one time young artist to another, go to the past to find out what is truly good and what is not. The Greeks set out certain porportions and sculpting concepts that held sway in the art world until the middle ages and then were rediscovered during the Renaissance. From then until really the end of the 19th century artists have continued in that tradition, but since the advent of "modern/post modern" art during the last century, much of that learning has gone out of use. This is true to a much greater degree in America than in Europe. Many of the figurative sculptors today are working apart from that tradition and are really using a more documentary approach which is akin to photorealism. Learning to distinguish between that approach and a truly classical approach will benefit you greatly. If you look to places like the New York Academy of Art, The Florence Academy of Art, and a few other places like them, you will see what the true standard is for excellence in the classical/figurative arts today.

Some artists from the past for you to look at are: Bernini, Carpeaux,
St. Gaudens, Myslbek,Vigeland, Rodin, and of course Michelangelo. The 19th century itself will provide a great many sculptors whose work is technically impeccable though somewhat dated by our standards.

Good luck in your pursuits

Jason
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Old 04-21-2005, 10:50 PM
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Re: Big names in contemporary figurative sculpture; GET TO WORK!

I have to thank Jason for reviving this earlier post, in which I frankly dropped the ball. The truth is, I put the question off originally because I’m not aware of any figurative artists working today, or even ones who have worked recently, whose work I consider exemplary.

I did plan to do some Google searches, and hoped the question might generate other answers, but the paucity of responses more or less accurately describes the state of figuration today. Relatively few people work in the field, and genuine genius is rare.

I’d say, the figurative artist today has to find his/her own way, and the path begins with a recognition that art comes from the mind and not from the eye. I have worked with the goal of making my sculpture reflect people around me rather than people of five hundred to several thousand years ago and a quarter of a world from where I live.

I’d suggest aspiring figurative artists look at the world around them, study the field twith whatever sources are available - museums, books, the Internet, schools. Acquire basic materials, techniques and aids such as modeling stands, armatures, clay, plaster, photography (to share your work and ask for help), and so on. I consider working from life essential and it’s not cheap, even through schools, unless you have one or more cooperative friends. And get to work!

Not the best answer, probably, but some suggestions have made it here, and hopefully this refreshed thread will add more.
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Old 04-21-2005, 11:12 PM
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Re: Big names in contemporary figurative sculpture

To do a bit more of my own homework I just checked the references in both Thursday’s and oddist’s posts. Thursday’s links to Christina Mikulasek’s website made my browser crash several times, but not before I could see some of the sculpture. It is good, and she seems to use classical references in much of her own work. Luigi Galligani’s site came in better, and I liked the 3 or 4 I saw, in a presumably “Flash” sequence.

I also checked Jason’s recommendation, sabinhoward.com. These works satisfy your request for anatomical realism, but strike me as precisely that, and illustrate my major point above - art is made with the mind and not the eye. This is sculpture which demonstrates anatomy and has little or no emotional content.

I still say, look around with whatever resources you have, and get to it.

Last edited by fritchie : 04-21-2005 at 11:35 PM.
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  #8  
Old 04-22-2005, 12:37 PM
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Re: Big names in contemporary figurative sculpture

To make an addition to what fritchie has said, I think that except for a couple of contemporary figurative scultptors, his assesment is correct. Today there are few that go beyond the documentary approach that seems to be the standard for so many. This is very much a result of a disconnect with the traditions of the past......I should amend my statement and say that if you look to these contemporary sculptors and institutions I listed you will see examples of the best that can be offered at this time. Thanks to fritchie for enabling me to clarify a point that did need it.

I also agree about Sabin Howard. His work is lacking in the area of emotive power, due in great part to his focus on technique...but he is still one of the best today. Technical skill has in many peoples' minds replaced creative vision, but that isn't to say that everyone has that mindset. I think that in many respects artists like Macdonald and Hartt have made a connection to that type of sculpture that in the past was the rule rather than the exception. In terms of living sculptors, you have to work with what you have.

Truly, for my money, the past is the best place you can find to reconnect with a visionary approach to art in general. Looking at a painter like El Greco informs my sculpture far more than the majority of the living sculptors today. Remember, sculptors aren't just limited to one medium for learning and inspiration. Look at any artist that seems to "get it". The art nouveau graphic artist Alphonse Mucha, for example, is an unlikely, but inspiring source for compositional and design elements as well as his ability to create a pleasing visual shorthand for the form. One of my favorite artists is John Singer Sargent, though many only see him as a portraitist, his use of paint is akin to Rodin's use of clay. The trait that makes a great sculptor is not always what you think and there are many two dimensional artists who possess these traits as well.

Think on this......If the artists of the late Gothic period had not looked back and revived much of the forgotten knowledge of the Greeks and Romans....there would not have been a Renaissance. We know that the result of their acknowledgement of the past is what radically changed the course of art in the western world. Are we of the figurative tradition at this time at such a crossroads now? When much of that knowledge that was passed down from period to period, each movement using it in a different way but holding to the universal truths of sculpture/art,.....when that knowledge by and large has ceased to be taught in most colleges and universities,...what is our recourse? We are in a position to allow that knowledge to pass out of memory or we can redisdover it as the Gothic artists did classical antiquity. The ball, as I see it, is in our court. This is a good thing I think.


Jason
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Old 04-22-2005, 10:48 PM
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Re: Big names in contemporary figurative sculpture

Since we're talking figurative sculpture of the present...is there opinion on the difference between European and American sculpture?
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  #10  
Old 04-23-2005, 12:00 AM
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Re: Big names in contemporary figurative sculpture

Quote:
Originally Posted by JasonGillespie
Think on this......If the artists of the late Gothic period had not looked back and revived much of the forgotten knowledge of the Greeks and Romans....there would not have been a Renaissance. We know that the result of their acknowledgement of the past is what radically changed the course of art in the western world. Are we of the figurative tradition at this time at such a crossroads now? When much of that knowledge that was passed down from period to period, each movement using it in a different way but holding to the universal truths of sculpture/art,.....when that knowledge by and large has ceased to be taught in most colleges and universities,...what is our recourse? We are in a position to allow that knowledge to pass out of memory or we can redisdover it as the Gothic artists did classical antiquity. The ball, as I see it, is in our court. This is a good thing I think.
Jason
Very astute comparison, Jason. People remark almost constantly about the rapid pace of change today, but until this post, I had not connected the state of figuration today with the state of Western art overall in the late Gothic period. Stagnation of Western culture for almost a thousand years nearly had cost us the greatest achievements of early Greece, Rome, and the other Mediterranean states. In our time, the threatened loss has occurred in just half a century.

The essence of the problem, as I see it, is the truly artificial nature of art. (Should I say creative nature?) I’ve probably described sculpture earlier in this forum as a language. In those terms, figuration is one dialect, or one language; construction with wood, metal, or other pre-formed components is another dialect or language, and so on. When a dialect or language nearly is lost, only a serious, dedicated (and often quite creative) individual or group can reverse the process.

I do think figuration is near this point of crisis, and workers in other arenas shouldn’t be complacent, because the same thing will happen there sooner or later. True, change is inevitable and not necessarily bad, but the time for creative energy applied in figuration is now. Call to action! (Sound like manifesto? I’ve never liked that concept, but perhaps it is conversations of this sort that bring them to being.)

Last edited by fritchie : 04-23-2005 at 12:10 AM.
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  #11  
Old 04-23-2005, 01:36 PM
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Re: Big names in contemporary figurative sculpture

To reply to the question of European and American sculpture....I am only venturing an opinion, but it seems to me that the European sentiment is one of casual disregard for fads or trends..atleast as we here in America understand those phenomena. Here we tend to run headlong into something and abandon ourselves to the latest and greatest. The result of this throwing the baby out with the bathwater approach makes for an unbalanced and myopic understanding of the arts. In large part we in America are children of the industrial revolution. Our national fabric is very much about industry. Old ways that are not as high tech or take longer become casualties. Much of our sculpture shows that. Why study or apprentice for years with an ackowledged master when you can strike out on your on? To the American sensibility this makes no sense. The result is a rush to creation that often times lacks the maturation that a few years of true scholarship might bring.

In Europe, however, you can still find respect for traditional knowledge. European countries by and large came of age a millennia ago and in many ways understand that not everything that is old needs replacing and that not everything new should be embraced. (Obiviously this is true in many non-European countries as well.) This makes for a much more balanced view of the arts in my opinion. We can learn from them in this respect. The problem is how to change something that is ingrained at a level that is almost subconscious? Our keeping up with the Joneses mentality makes us vulnerable to missing the forest for the trees.

Jason
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Old 04-29-2005, 03:28 PM
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Re: Big names in contemporary figurative sculpture

I don't know that I can add allot of theory to this discussion and certainly don't know anything about the present situation of figurative sculpture in the US, but in 1986 I personally could not find someone who could teach me figurative sculpture in Canada and was restricted to creating abstract sculpture (I am not complaining, I think that this was very valuable knowledge). I moved to Europe to study figurative sculpture and was lucky enough to find another job there in order to support my studies. I made a promise to my teacher, (an American teaching in Paris) that I would pass along the method of sculpting that he taught, which he said was a very old method and that he thought it was being lost. I have made good this promise and now an associate teaches this method in Nice France.
In Europe, traditional methods and practices are highly valued as Jason has suggested and yet economics forces us all to update our methods. I think that this traditional method, I was taught, is difficult to follow as it is too time consuming to support the economics of the sculpture produced, thus the sculptor must use the American revolution attitude in order to survive.
To further disadvantage the French sculptor, the tax law limits editions to 12 copies after which a 19.6% tax is charged on behalf of the state.
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Old 06-15-2005, 07:45 PM
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Re: Big names in contemporary figurative sculpture

You have to find out the strent of figurative art not only realisum.No body menshuned Ivan Mestrovich and Bordel.Vigelan is also good one.All anather authors that was menshuned they are soft and unrelaible .
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Old 06-15-2005, 07:53 PM
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Re: Big names in contemporary figurative sculpture

You have to find out the strent of figurative art not only realisum.No body menshuned Ivan Mestrovich and Bordel.Vigelan is also good one.All anather authors that was menshuned they are soft and unrelaible .
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Old 06-15-2005, 10:18 PM
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Re: Big names in contemporary figurative sculpture

Jason,Total props on your view in Fredric Hartt,and McDonald's bonzes are powerful.To throw another bone in this thread,Is Western art more figuritive than artist on the East coast?The galleries out west have a lot of very prominent figuritive work,But go to the Swank galleries in Atlanta,Charlotte,Miami,ect and you rarley see figurtive art.I love figuritive art,and I am glad there is a bunch of sculpture hounds still fired up about it.All one has to do is stand under David in Italy,see Hartt's Wasington Cathedral,or one of MacDonald's bronzes and your hooked.

Page Bradley's web site only showed the cover page,but looked impressive.Maybe this thread has so many folks checkinging it out it crashed? Also, it sounds like jason needs to be knee deep in plastaline freeking sculpting away,please don't do it on a computer.
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Old 06-17-2005, 01:47 AM
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Re: Big names in contemporary figurative sculpture

I do believe that figurative sculpture will always exist worldwide
and every generation will produce new masters to continue the
tradition.

Robert Graham, John Houser and Mark Prent (who shares what he knows)
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Old 09-24-2005, 05:06 AM
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Re: Big names in contemporary figurative sculpture

I agree that there will always be an interest and demand for figurative sculpture, but I do doubt that every generation will have it's "masters". It would seem that label should be reserved for true greatness. I think generations often pass without anyone taking up that torch in a particular field; we're often too close to ourselves and our own generation to make those judgements correctly.

I'm new to figurative sculpture and it's true, it is difficult to find really good work. I initially liked Richard MacDonald, and clearly he is very talented, but his work ultimately leaves me a bit empty. I think a student could learn a lot from him though and he does offer classes - just can't afford it ($$$). Paige Bradley was an assistant to MacDonald and so her work looks very much the same.

I agree with Jason's statements regarding the "documentary" or technical approach of many sculptors today. It's as though the artists focus is too much on anatomy and correctness and not enough on making us feel. Ultimately, "making us feel" would seem to be what it's about.

Two sculptor's works I landed on recently were, Lee Dunsmore at http://www.artistshouse.com./ He or she is very talented, just wish their was more work and larger pictures. The other artist is David Frech at http://www.davidfrech.com./ Also very talented, he's able to capture a quality of life that is beyond mere technique. Also wish he had more work to see.

Last edited by Janet Michael : 09-24-2005 at 05:21 AM.
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Old 09-24-2005, 11:47 AM
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Re: Big names in contemporary figurative sculpture

Hi Janet.I use to work and educate in sculpture more that twoenty years and I am a young man.So I know my job.But I concider this is a hoby.I sell nothing .This is the best jugement for profesionalism.Every thing that I do is yltimately in plaster becouse I can't affore the cast.There are some of my works.So you to be big sculptor is not only to know how and able to do.Good luck.Arnis
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Old 10-05-2005, 09:03 AM
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Re: Big names in contemporary figurative sculpture

Important sculptors in the American art scene
My top ten:
Richard McDonald
Jane DeDecker
Glenna Goodacre
Tuck Langland
Joseph Sheppard
Jan Rosetta
Victor Issa
Richard McDermott Miller
Martin Eichinger

Some of these are going to be remembered more for their contribution to 'sculpture' rather than for their own pieces necessarily, (Langland and Sheppard), and in making up this list, I think there are others that are extremely noteworthy, whose names will continue to appear: Richard Blake, Edward Fleming, Barbara Margolis, Dan Ostermiller, Tim Cherry, W. Stanly Proctor, Christopher Smith, Saiji Saito, Veryl Goodnight, Judith Bransome, Jay Hall Carpenter, Carol Harless, and Gary Lee Price, just to name a few. I wish there were a good site I could send you to to view their important works, but even internet searches return anemic results at best.

However, if it is inspiration and emulation you desire, I can only repeat what others have said: return to the Greeks and Romans, spend time in the Louvre, and make a pilgrimage to Florence.
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Old 04-06-2006, 12:41 PM
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Smile Re: Big names in contemporary figurative sculpture

I recently discovered Sabin Howard's work through his Hermes at the TimeWarner Center in NYC (currently 2nd floor). It is breathtaking. I disagree with JasonGillespie who said (above), "His work is lacking in the area of emotive power, due in great part to his focus on technique...but he is still one of the best today." It is true that Sabin Howard is one of the best today (I imagine that soon he will be widely accepted as THE best), but I can't imagine how anyone could accuse him of lacking emotive power. Quite the contrary; this masterpiece exudes fundamental feelings of peace, joy and love. Maybe those are not really emotions, and it is true that one does NOT sense "emotion" in the sense of angst or anger in Sabin Howard's work. The New York Times comparisons to Donatello and Rodin are apt. In the case of Sabin Howard's Hermes, it appears on par even with Michelangelo.

This is an artist to watch.
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Old 04-09-2006, 05:21 PM
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Re: Big names in contemporary figurative sculpture

Nobody has named Igor Mitoraj -- the German-born Polish sculptor who lives and works in both France and Pietrasanta.

Here is one link for some of his larger cast pieces:

http://www.adhikara.com/igor-mitoraj/index.html

Though at first glance his work (carved marble, cast bronze and iron, some fired ceramic) seems classically realistic, it has layers of references that keep it from being a re-hash of classic figurative work.

Mitoraj is widely exhibited in Europe and I've seen some of his work in Japan, but other than a 'Spoleto' festival in Charleston back in the early 1990s I very rarely see references to his work in American publications. I don't think he offers any kind of classes anywhere, but I just can't imagine talking about contemporay figurative sculpture without including his work.

Another sculptor who does some excellent highly-realistic figurative work (including forensic anthropology) is Phillip Faraut:

http://www.philippefaraut.com/

He offers classes on his website if you are in the New York area.
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Old 04-10-2006, 01:44 AM
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Re: Big names in contemporary figurative sculpture

Thanks for the links to the two remarkable artists Dondougan.

Digressing a bit, I notice when Mitoraj presents the large figurative bronzes with parts of their antomies cut off, he show the cut off edges of the hollow bronze, rather than covering up the openings.

I'm sure he has good reasons for doing so, perhaps to make it obvious that the bronze pieces are hollow. On the other hand, I can think of quite a few reasons why this is undesirable, some are visual/artistic, and some are practical. On balance, I think I would prefer covering them up.

Last edited by Merlion : 04-10-2006 at 01:50 AM.
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Old 04-10-2006, 08:42 AM
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Re: Big names in contemporary figurative sculpture

Don - Thanks for calling attention to Igor Mitoraj here. I certainly think he belongs in this group. Someone posted at least one image of his on the site a year or so ago, and I found the work very impressive. It's an odd mixture of classical figuration and modern diversion, sort of theatrical in a way, but overall I like it and find it substantive.

On Merlion's point about ragged edges or internal openings, I commonly do the same on my partial figures, but there also are cases where I close them. Just whatever seems appropriate at the time and for the particular piece.
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Old 04-10-2006, 11:15 AM
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Re: Big names in contemporary figurative sculpture

Doudougan.Igor Mitoraj.I named him ,if you check my posts.That is the way how the sculpture should be done. Doudougan again hit in the target.I mentioned Phillip Faraut in other forum.The people there wonderred where to study and prefere Richard Mc Donald .I wasn't agree with them.Doudougan.It is good to see somebody who knows what is a good sculpture.

Last edited by Arnis : 04-10-2006 at 11:53 AM.
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Old 04-12-2006, 09:57 PM
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Re: Big names in contemporary figurative sculpture

[I am very interested in this request because I am forming a list of "Who,s Who", in practicing Contemporary Sculptors to be used for corporate and private investors. I have enjoyed reading your replies and would appreciate any further information regarding gallery and museum quaility sculptors interested in representation. This is a premier project w/ little or no cost involved for listing and background and location information.

Thank You,
Saundra Hough
MASA
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