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  #26  
Old 08-19-2012, 07:04 AM
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GarryRicketson GarryRicketson is offline
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Re: Might be buying a store

I am looking forward to seeing how this turns out, when you have it all fixed up and are ready to open,..looks like you have quite a bit of work ahead of you. And hope the loan comes thru,..good luck !
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  #27  
Old 08-20-2012, 01:37 PM
Art-Deco Art-Deco is offline
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Re: Might be buying a store

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Originally Posted by GarryRicketson View Post
I am looking forward to seeing how this turns out, when you have it all fixed up and are ready to open,..looks like you have quite a bit of work ahead of you. And hope the loan comes thru,..good luck !

Thanks Garry,
The bank is supposed to do the apprasal today or tomorrow I'm told.
I also learned that no permits are required for the work I described, they would if I was going to add on to the building or do something that would extend the building out further on the sidewalk.
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  #28  
Old 08-21-2012, 06:54 AM
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Re: Might be buying a store

Its sounds ideal. All the best to you & the bank for a speedy yes.

It sounds like it is time for the fun to begin.

Carl
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  #29  
Old 08-21-2012, 01:03 PM
PTsideshow PTsideshow is offline
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Re: Might be buying a store

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Originally Posted by Art-Deco View Post
Thanks Garry,
I also learned that no permits are required for the work I described, they would if I was going to add on to the building or do something that would extend the building out further on the sidewalk.
That sounds like you have caught a break on that one! Good as some times the silly paper work with the town office can take long than some of the jobs you will be doing!
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  #30  
Old 08-26-2012, 04:45 AM
Art-Deco Art-Deco is offline
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Re: Might be buying a store

The apprasal is done, now waiting on the abstracts/title search which takes 3-4 days, so it looks like I'm approved

I went today and measured the front windows and the door, I checked into what's required for door width and the like to make sure I don't run into issues with the ADA stuff for wheelchair access. Looks like you need to have at least 32" opening which doesn't translate into a 32" wide DOOR due to the fact that when you open a door 90 degrees, it's thickness plus the hinge offset puts the door slightly into the opening, so I determined I will need 34" wide doors, and they should open outwards. I'm also looking into whether tempered glass is required for the two doors I need to build.

The glass measures 58" wide, 77" tall, so I plotted out a few configurations, the first one would need the glass 5" wider, since it would be pretty expensive to replace both windows just to get them 5" wider, I think I will make the two square outside corner columns 7" wide, the two inside columns the same, and with two 34" doors and the framing I might need to fill in 2" to 3" on either side of the doorway frame to reach the two inner posts.

The side window panes are 31" wide, those will just be moved 90 degrees to the larger panes.
I'm going to have to remove those side panes to do it, and I calculated the glass weighs 50# and hoping I won't have to remove the larger ones to redo the spandrel panels under them- those weigh 100#

Here's the spandrel panel under one of the panes, and the angled side window as they are now, got a nasty feeling the glass will have to come out to do any work on what it's resting on but I won't know untill I look at what's behind that panel. That's 100# of glass, tho I can lift 100#, I think the glass due to size and how easy it is to break if bumped is pretty much a 2 man deal with two sets of suction cups

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  #31  
Old 09-07-2012, 09:14 PM
Art-Deco Art-Deco is offline
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Re: Might be buying a store

I peeled off some of the boards covering the left pillar to reveal some high quality hard brick in 2 colors, and a border formed with specially shaped bricks. I also found there are 6 windows above the display windows and door that were sheetrocked over on the inside and covered with the barnboard on the outside, they go all the way up to the 13 foot ceiling level.
If I can get a scaffold from my nextdoor neighbor who offered it, I might do some archaeology this weekend into that barnboard front!



Looking to the front from the center, the floor unfortunately has 2 layers of linoleum and that's a real mess, I think I'll be ahead of the game to just forget trying to scrap/sand to the original wood and just overlay it with underlayment and then hardwood parquet, with a couple of long runner rugs in the walking aisles or something. I can get the parquet for about $1.03/sq ft to do the 500 sq ft area I'll start with.



Looking from the center to the rear where there's what I'd call a mezzanine which is about 20 feet deep and I guess was originally used for office space. Under it is a small restroom, and the stairs to the basement. In the basement I found all 3 original doors that came from there, and 2 of them had never been painted- just varnished, and they have a sort of Art Deco style double border and panel, the original nickel plated hardware, and I only had to trim an inch off the bottoms to put them back in place- thats a new floor in the rear- linoleum over 3/4" ply, so the doors didn't fit because of the height change.
That seasick green IS the color that's there now, it's no after effects from the lighting, that's the actual color some crazy person thought would look nice on the walls in the back of the building where there's no windows and where you would want the walls to be bright and light as possible!


And then the ceiling is tin, is good condition save for a couple of spots that have rust, the dark spots of missing paint in the photo are where hangars for a suspended ceiling were hammered back when the suspended ceiling was removed by someone.

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  #32  
Old 09-08-2012, 07:32 AM
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obseq obseq is offline
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Re: Might be buying a store

Wow, you really lucked out with the tin ceilings!

Do you know what kind of wood is underneath the linoleum?
Could be worth your time... It would be a shame to keep it covered.

I'm definitely interested to see what else you find!
Congratulations again on a great building...
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  #33  
Old 09-08-2012, 08:44 PM
Art-Deco Art-Deco is offline
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Re: Might be buying a store

Yeha I did, there's a couple of cornice pieces missing and a couple that have rust from past roof leaks (it now has a rubber roof) and those rusted pieces might have to be replaced with new ones of a similar design as they are pretty bad, but the rest is in good shape.

I don't know what wood is under the linoleum, it's not oak but likely to be maple as it has a fine grain where I can see a little of it, but the linoleum on it is real lousy and real stuck, and the first layer has some kind of black asphalt backer instead of vinyl, and a couple of spots I was able to scrape up a couple of loos tiles, the black asphalt has sort of "melted" onto the wood leaving a black tarry like residue. Either layer is old enough one or both could have asbestos in their makeup and it's best to leave that alone since it's a nightmare to remove and dispose of.
There is a "patch" in the front 6 feet that appears to be plywood, and underneath in the basement there's new joists in that section, it's almost like there was a "porch" or staircase, or the original front was set back from the sidewalk, I'd never get that area to match the rest.

I took part of the partition wall out and painted more today, and because the insurance agent wanted a photo of the back of the building, I got that and then realized the window upstairs in the mezzanine which was boarded over on the outside- could be revealed again if I cut the opening out of the barnboard siding that I discovered is on the back wall too like the front. I thought the window abutted the wall of the adjacent building but it's above the roof, so I opened the window, yanked out the old screen still there, and cut a hole thru and happily discovered it's a 36 x42 window that is completely clear on the outside to being used again with no obstructions in front of it.
Once I cut that out, it lit up the whole back area considerably since the window faces West. I'll have to replace that old double hung single pane window with a new one as this one is going to be drafty and cold.

I mopped the linoleum floored area and the mezzanine floor to get rid of all the dust from the cabinet maker's router or whatever he used most back there, and the linoleum there is white, and in good new condition, it will be a good area for classes, making molds etc.
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  #34  
Old 09-09-2012, 04:03 PM
Andrew Werby Andrew Werby is offline
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Re: Might be buying a store

You might try one of those orange terpene goo-removers on that black tarry residue, if you're trying to restore the floor. There are testing services that will tell you if there's asbestos in a sample of your linoleum tiles. If so, I'd say leave it there, and cover it up with another layer of flooring.

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  #35  
Old 09-09-2012, 07:23 PM
Art-Deco Art-Deco is offline
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Re: Might be buying a store

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Originally Posted by Andrew Werby View Post
You might try one of those orange terpene goo-removers on that black tarry residue, if you're trying to restore the floor. There are testing services that will tell you if there's asbestos in a sample of your linoleum tiles. If so, I'd say leave it there, and cover it up with another layer of flooring.

Andrew Werby
The 2 layers of linoleum would have to be scraped up and removed first, it almost looks like they had carpet over it last with some carpet adhesive stuck onto the linoleum too, it's a real chore and mess to remove, and the condition of the wood floor under it all is likely to be poor, from what I see too in a couple of spots lacking linoleum and the tarry residue, it seemed to have been stained dark originally. It appears old enough to be in the asbestos floor tile production era, it's almost a given thats what this tile is going to have, it's about 1500 sq feet worth like this:



The rear has a new floor- linoleum on 3/4" CDX. I removed the rest of the stupid partition wall which also kept sunlight from even getting into the rear area, now there's more light thereand it's not a windowless lightless tomb like it was!

The next photo is up on the mezzanine, that was the window that was boarded up which isn't any longer It lets a decent amount of sunlight in.
I used the ladder to get up on the roof to check it out, and it has a white PVC membrane roof in good shape. That green is the actual color they painted all the walls and everything in the back half, up in the front half they paint it a purple-blue dark color.

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  #36  
Old 09-10-2012, 06:46 AM
PTsideshow PTsideshow is offline
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Re: Might be buying a store

Looks pretty good, on the tile and asbestos the bigger danger with asbestos in building materials is anything that is friable, easily broken or crumbles.
Generally the only way it can get out of the floor tile, and into to humans is if it is ingested. As an inhalation hazard it is on the low side. Don't grind it,sand it. After going through about 350 hours of asbestos training for the job as a facilities manger, pipe covering that contains it, drapery that contains the fibers, ceiling tiles and old style cement board ceiling fire proofing. Are bigger concerns, anything that will put dust in the air. Since the asbestos fibers will hag in the air for a long time, drifting on the slightest air current movements.

If you think you have any in the building, it can be encapsulated or removed neither is cheap.

Wear disposable gloves gloves, and the boiler suits, since transfer of the asbestos fibers are a big problem. They can be transferred to the car seat, and to other clothes in the washer and dryer. And transferring for a long time.

Make sure that the mask are rated for asbestos and it fits your face. Dust masks, surgical, and the other nuisance order and dust mask will not protect you! No matter what some of the idiots on the net says.

Dust proof safety glasses, has a foam seal around them

Changeable cartridge half masks

Make sure the cartridges are rated for asbestos.
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  #37  
Old 09-14-2012, 10:33 PM
Art-Deco Art-Deco is offline
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Re: Might be buying a store

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Looks pretty good, on the tile and asbestos the bigger danger with asbestos in building materials is anything that is friable, easily broken or crumbles.

If you think you have any in the building, it can be encapsulated or removed neither is cheap.

Wear disposable gloves gloves, and the boiler suits, since transfer of the asbestos fibers are a big problem. They can be transferred to the car seat, and to other clothes in the washer and dryer. And transferring for a long time.
I think the floor tile having been covered with some kind of carpet adhesive is good, it' is going to stay there and be covered over with 3/4 underlayment and oak flooring on top and left in place.
There is however I discovered, that "Zonolite" vermiculite insulation in the attic, about 3" worth. I went in to examine the space, see if there even was any insulation, and check out the wiring which is up there for the ceiling lights. I exited the space and sealed the little plywood access door permanently with caulk and screws once I recognized the stuff.
I had thought maybe of adding some blown in insulation up there, but now I'm not going to mess with that, the gallery isn't going to be open in the winter months anyway, so the thermostat will probably be set around 50, mor einsulation wouldn't make much difference anyway.

That stuff is not good, and unfortunately it's been installed into upwards of 35 MILLION homes and businesses in the USA, but fortunately the ceiling is tin and in good shape.
I started caulking around the edges where the tin cornice meets the wall to seal up all small cracks and gaps, there are a few here and there and they need to be totally sealed up.
I know the local electrical contractor guy, and his work since Ive worked with him a few times, whomever installed the romex in the attic for the lights must have been in the 70s or something, and the guy who had to crawl thru the zonolite and install the wiring would have been very exposed to it and tracked it into his truck, home etc
That would be a pretty typical thing for cable tv, electricians, plumbers, roofers and HVAC installers who have to go into attics with that stuff and work for hours and hours.
Guy I work with says he has zonolite in his attic at home, and that he blew in some fiberglass insulation on top of it, oh boy! the air and movement in there would certainly blow that asbestos all over and then into the house, tracked in the carpet and then the wife with the vacuum would get it in the air...

There's 2 pieces of tin that have rust spots from past roof leaks, I was going to replace those after removing them, but I won't do that now- I'll just patch the holes and cover it over with a new piece and leave the old in place. Unlike a house, the building has no partition walls, nothing that joins the ceiling/attic, and all the tin on the ceiling goes right to the brick walls.
I should have that done tomorrow, I bought 6 tubes of 35 year paintable caulk and plan to go all around the perimeter of the room with it.

The only area where there might be an issue is where the wires come thru for the lights, but I decided rather than ever going back up in the attic again, even though the wiring is up there and i was going to change out the light fixtures for new- I'm going to surface mount 1/2" conduit and boxes, and run a new line up to that and totally avoid messing with the wiring in the attic- it'll be disconnected.
Some of the conenctions I saw in the attic were amateur at best, wire nuts on the wires but not packed into the steel junction boxes- just left hanging out, romex going down into a 1/2" conduit with no box or connector- just stuffed down inside the conduit to go to the wall switch.
Some outlets have only 2 slots, so I think I will feel lots better just to run new stuff from the basement.

Nice thing is, there's ten lengths of new, unused 1/2" emt conduit sitting on a shelf in the basement, 100' worth which is almost enough to do the ceiling lights.

I had wet mopped the floors twice, and now all the walls are painted. I believe there was carpeting in there before, and it had been rolled up and removed, chances are the carpet had some fibers in it.

That zonolite is in google in many places, what's amazing is W.R. Grace who owned the mine and produced the stuff KNEW since 1950 their mine and their product was contaminated by asbestos, yet they continued allowing workers to mine with no protective gear, and sold the product nationwide in hardware stores, Sears etc for homeowners and others to dump in their attics, the bags advertised the product was "safe, effective."

A tag I found had the brand name and all on it, and the price was $1.20 for a 4 cu ft bag, and with a little goggle searching I learned it was advertised for $1.20 around 1964 so it must have been installed around then.

W.R. Grace went bankrupt in the 80s and left the EPA and us with the cleanup bill for the city of Libby Mt which their mine contaminated, they reorganized and right back in business again!

One site I found had the story of this guy who helped his dad install the stuff in the family's house when he was 15, and how he used to play in the attic because the zonolite stuff was like fluffy sand, now after 3 surgeries for cancers he had the stuff removed from the attic at a cost of $15,000, it was filtering down through the walls and light switches etc.

Last edited by Art-Deco : 09-14-2012 at 10:49 PM.
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  #38  
Old 09-18-2012, 10:06 PM
Art-Deco Art-Deco is offline
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Re: Might be buying a store

Friday afternoon I'm going to borrow 3 sections of scaffold and set it up in front of the building and see about removing the barnboard facade. Two sections will get me up about 11-1/2 feet which isn't quite high enough to reach the top, so it will take dragging 3 sections over to do it.
Going to pull off 3 or 4 boards and see what I'm getting into, they'll either go back on or the rest will all come off.
The big unknown is the white PVC roof membrane goes over the parapet wall and fastens onto the barnboard on the front with a strip of metal screwed on about every 6 inches across



Apparently they laid and attached what sounds like a sheet of 3/4" plywood over the top of the brick parapet wall and extending over the top of the barnboard framework which sticks out about 8" from the brickwork, so with the barnboard and it's framework removed I'm not sure yet how I will deal with that plywood and re-fastening the material with that metal strip.
I'm guessing I will have to trim about 8" off the plywood, maybe 6" off the roof material, and fasten the roof material with the metal strip to the mortar between the bricks with tapcons.
I'm guessing the plywood is anchored to the top of a capstone on the wall.

Depending on what it looks like, i could possibly leave the top 12" of framework and the roof over it intact, add a facia board, a board on the underside, make and attach 4 large corbels under that for a decorative cornice.

In any case I should find out Friday, and if I need something at the hardware store around the corner, it IS open Saturday.

Last edited by Art-Deco : 09-18-2012 at 10:18 PM.
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  #39  
Old 09-21-2012, 09:37 PM
Art-Deco Art-Deco is offline
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Re: Might be buying a store

I spent about 7 hours removing the front, I got 98% of it off and by then it was getting dark, my back was sore and I was hungry, thirsty and tired. After cleaning up the sidewalk I called it a day.

The facade is pretty nice, and not far off from what I suspected it would look like for the era.
The roof overhang turned out to be a fairly easy one to deal with, I found the whole barnboard facade assembly was mostly cantlevered over the parapet wall with 2x6s suspending 2x4s and attached with plywood plates nailed and glued. I just jigsawed thru the plywood at the joints, removed the suspened 2x4s leaving the roof portion intact.



All I'll have to do is secure every other 2x6 to the capstone with a bracket and a tapcon, apply a facia board and an underboard to close it in, and if I add a fancy molding to the facia board it will make a decent looking cornice.

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  #40  
Old 09-22-2012, 07:58 PM
Art-Deco Art-Deco is offline
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Re: Might be buying a store

I have all the old barnboard junk removed, turned out to be redwood, and I now have almost half the cornice up and caulked. I had to buy about 4 different lengths of screws but the system I came up with worked well- I ripped a couple of 14' 2x4s to 2-1/2" wide and screwed them on edge to the underside of the overhanging 2x6s with 5" coated deck screws, and then tap cons thru it into the capstone about every 3 feet has it nice and secured. Then the treated facia board and eave board underneath both box it in weather tight. It will get a dark green paint.

The pain with this is having to move the scaffold 3 times to get across the width to remove the old stuff, and then 3 times back, and tomorrow 3 times back again to paint. The sidewalk has a slight tilt to it, so I had to use 3/4" boards under the wheels on the curb side to get the scaffold mostly level. I had to get one more section of scaffold this morning so I could have some kind of "wall" around while working on the deck laid on what was the very top yesterday. Nothing like standing on a wobbly narrow deck with no sides 20 feet in the air, not too bad if sitting on the deck, but I bit the bullet and went and got another section and dragged it up along with another alumaplank deck section and brace.

I forgot to bring back my card, so I didn't take pics today, but tomorrow morning the sun on the facade should produce a good current photo.
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  #41  
Old 09-23-2012, 01:45 PM
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Re: Might be buying a store

Looks good so far the insert brick box with the pattern and assorted color border bricks is a nice touch, I like it. Should have rented the wheels and jack screws for the scaffold it would be worth the money, just in time and aggravations saving. I know that I would never use a scaffolding with out them again. I bought a set of wheels and the jack screws and never looked back.
Be careful on it, you don't bounce good when ya hit the ground!
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  #42  
Old 09-23-2012, 07:35 PM
Art-Deco Art-Deco is offline
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Re: Might be buying a store

I borrowed the scaffold from work, it has wheels, though one of them doesn't "lock" any more the other 3 do.
They have aset of levelling jacks for it and I forgot about them till AFTER I already had the thing up. At first glance the sidewalk didn't seem to have much tilt but afetr getting 16 feet of scaffold up it was clearly farther out from the wall at the top than below, 3/4 boards got half of it, it could have used another 3/4" to be plumb.
I was able to tie it in a bit to the old awning anchors just in case some kid let the brake levers off over night- wouldn't want it to roll out into the street!

It's all done now, the cornice is all boxed in primed and painted, I removed the old awning anchors and the last of the old wood frame.
I was told the barnboard siding was put up about 40 years ago, so no one has seen this facade for the last 40 years.

I found that there must have been a projecting cornice over the display windows and doors originally, as the board under the 6 windows was bare pine, so for now I primed and painted it to keep the maisture out. There was remnants of sheet copper above the board that was cut all the way across, it must have covered the "roof" of a projecting cornice. I plan to build something similar/appropriate to replace what was removed, and put it up next spring.

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  #43  
Old 09-23-2012, 08:28 PM
PTsideshow PTsideshow is offline
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Re: Might be buying a store

Looks good so far, with a little tuck pointing and either acid washing the brick or dry ice blasting of the brick bring it back to its heyday. The dry ice blasting leaves only the material that is removed to be swept up. Cost more but in the end it is cheaper.
Your are doing a nice job on it.
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  #44  
Old 09-24-2012, 07:11 AM
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Re: Might be buying a store

Think you have already increased the value of your investment. Loks great.
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  #45  
Old 10-04-2012, 02:45 AM
Art-Deco Art-Deco is offline
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Re: Might be buying a store

I started laying in plywood for the subfloor, removed most of the hanging fluorescent lamps and have half the ceiling painted now too. I also replaced the old rear window with a new double glass argon unit.
Looks like my insurance co says their underwriter field agent and my agent would like to come look at the business, or I suppose they meant building, guess we'll see what they want!
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  #46  
Old 10-10-2012, 02:21 AM
Art-Deco Art-Deco is offline
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Re: Might be buying a store

The insurance guy was very nice, we had a good chat and he had nothing negative or any "concerns" with the building. Looks like my policy will cover my sculptures and artifacts at home too since they are part of the same assets being insured at the building.

I wanted everything to look good before he arrived so he would have nothing to complain about. I was glad to be rid of all the old metal filing cabinets in the basement- a load I figure was probably 600# worth, plus a bunch of fluorescent lamps too, scrap guy hauled it all away for the steel.
I decided to clean the basement up good since there was a lot of grit, dust and sand where the file cabinets were stacked, I was amazed how many times I had to clean the shop vac filter and dump it, it took about 30# off the concrete floor worth of sand, grit, dust. Then I wet mopped the whole floor, having to change the water a dozen times.

I also pulled out the breakers for all disconnected/obsolete circuits.
With the basement nice and clean I painted the upstairs staircase, mopped and vacuumed the whole ground floor, and vacuumed all the heat/AC ducts and intakes which were full of sawdust and hopefully with all that done, it will eliminate the dust tracked around and up the stairs from walking in the basement.
I have had a good sized HEPA air filter on "high" running the last couple of weeks, and it's picked up quite a bit of dust on the prefilter.
The fluorescent lamps I took down all had a 1/4" layer of wood dust on top of them and the bulbs were coated with it too from the kitchen counter craftsman who had rented the place for about a year.

Looking good, with half the ceiling painted now, and half the floor that will get hardwood- sheeted with plywood.

I ordered 4 pieces of tin ceiling, 2 of them are just a ball peened texture 2'x4' and the other 2 pieces are a cornice that while it's not exactly the same design as the original, it looks pretty close, I need 6 sections of that to replace 4 missing pieces and 2 that have rust holes, but ordered 2 to see how they will work. The 4 pieces were only a little over $50 plus the UPS, certainly cheap enough to wind up with a restored ceiling.
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  #47  
Old 10-10-2012, 06:21 AM
PTsideshow PTsideshow is offline
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Re: Might be buying a store

Sounds like it is coming along, and it is good to know that your coverage company has no issues and all of the items are covered even at different locations. Can't wait to see the finished set up.
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  #48  
Old 10-13-2012, 09:38 PM
Art-Deco Art-Deco is offline
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Re: Might be buying a store

Yeah slowly but surely! I have about 3/4 of the ceiling painted, and I built 2 sections of railings 8 feet long about 30" high to visually divide the space. I need to make 2 newel posts for them yet once I design them.

I'll be real glad to get the ceiling finished, it's a real chore! Nothing I hate more than working on the ceiling and having to reach up, not to mention constantly going up and down the ladder.
I plan to paint some more tomorrow, and frame in the rear window inside and out, caulk and paint that and that's done.
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Old 10-14-2012, 06:41 AM
PTsideshow PTsideshow is offline
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Re: Might be buying a store

Check out the paint dept @ the local big box store. They have extension poles that screw into the threaded hole in the handle of the roller frame. They come in telescoping sizes from 3'/6' ,6'/12', 12'/24' in two section and 3 sections.

In combination with a 5 gallon bucket and the roller screen for the bucket. With a drop cloth they can cut down the time needed,to do walls and ceilings. They also have wire brushes, sanding screen holders and one that holders a brush. I never could get the brush to do what I wanted it to do.

The roller spinner to clean them is another great time saver, the cut down bucket has angle brackets in it to sit on top of the rim of another bucket and contain the spray coming off the spinning roller cover. Or if you are going to use it again, and have a fridge put the brush or roller in a plastic bag close it up and put in the fridge till you need it again.

They also work well for the handles for the snow roof rakes if you need them.

Got tired of the store bought ones bending and breaking!
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  #50  
Old 10-14-2012, 03:54 PM
Art-Deco Art-Deco is offline
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Re: Might be buying a store

Oh sweet! I hadn't seen the roller spinner you mention but remember the screen inside a 5 gal bucket deal.
The big issue with my ceiling is the tins' projections and recesses are very difficult to get paint into, so I chose the fluffiest roller cover they had and it worked well, but I still had to work the paint in and run the roller in 4 different directions to get it in every spot on each 24" square panel. I'm not sure a long handled pole would be stiff enough.
I did finish the main ceiling today however, and had a cup of paint left over in the tray to start on the upper ceiling over the mezzanine. Thankfully that ceiling is only about 6-1/2 feet high.

I still have the cornice to do yet, but 40 feet is done more or less.
I have some replacement pieces of tin coming this week, hopfully I can get them up in place without too much difficulty and not disturbing the insulation, not going to be easy to get nails in to wood blindly, since I don't want to pull down the damaged old pieces I might just use some small long screws, and even a 3/4"wide piece of 1/8" thick flat steel. along the edge might help pull it all up tight to the rafters.



The railings I also put in today after staining them, they are made of oak, and the verticals are 1" square, a take from the mezzanine's softwood railings it complements that but will be clear coated not painted.
They were fairly easy to make but a bear to assemble by myself. I cut a dado 1/4" deep in the top and bottom boards for the 1x's to fit into, and then 1/4" thick x 1" wide strips of oak about 5-1/2" long for spacers. I fitted the "spacers" 1" apart, glued and pinned them in, then a dab of glue in the gap between each and the verticals all tapped into the bottom board, same for the top board, and the it was fatted down over the tops of the verticals starting at one end and when all the verticals were locked into their little sockets they are pinned in from the bottom along with 12 screws holds it all nice and secure.

I need to make and put in 2 newel posts and then that will be a nice permanent room divider.



The pics are little greenish because I had a couple of fluorescent lamps on.

Last edited by Art-Deco : 10-14-2012 at 04:12 PM.
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