Sculpture Community - Sculpture.net  

Go Back  Sculpture Community - Sculpture.net > Sculpture Roundtable Discussions > Figurative Sculpture
User Name
Password
Home Sculpture Community Photo Gallery ISC Sculpture.org Register FAQ Members List Search New posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #26  
Old 07-30-2007, 12:40 AM
underfoot's Avatar
underfoot underfoot is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: australia
Posts: 359
Re: Artist defends surfing sculpture amid criticism

Quote:
Originally Posted by Limpet
The politicians that paid for the art said it was a beginner surfer, not the artist. The artist is saying the surfer is doing a floater, which is a fairly technical move not accessable to someone without years of experience.
the floater would have to be one of the more technically difficult
moves in an experienced surfers repertoire
it requires the surfer to produce enough speed and momentum
on the face of a wave to be able to continue riding over the top of the breaking section .

I'm still not convinced that such a sublime frozen moment can be captured
by plonking a bodycast on a board
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	floater.JPG
Views:	249
Size:	37.4 KB
ID:	6701  
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 07-30-2007, 01:34 AM
furby furby is offline
Level 9 user
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: australia
Posts: 286
Re: Artist defends surfing sculpture amid criticism

Wow that Surfer Mag link is hilarious... they sure don't hold nothing back

Maybe we should start a www.yoursculpturesux.net where we rip each others work right up.....
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 07-30-2007, 02:12 AM
Musicman92130 Musicman92130 is offline
Level 4 user
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: San Diego
Posts: 72
Re: Artist defends surfing sculpture amid criticism

I live in San Diego and I sculpt. I know the waves well in Encinitas and Cardiff and I have surfed the area for many years. By the way most of the area is locals only for surfing. You could have some 50 year old guy trying to kick your ass if you cut in.

But anyway technically I think it is quite good, but it has nothing to do with surfing. Any beginner who holds their hands out like that is going to fall back ward and pitch the board. You want to keep your hands close and get really low when starting out. Surfing can be such a graceful sport and this guys captures none of that. What a shame.
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 07-30-2007, 07:26 AM
CroftonGraphics CroftonGraphics is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Scotland
Posts: 341
Re: Artist defends surfing sculpture amid criticism

I googled his name and one article I think said he surfed since a kid and has shaped boards.

But to me it doesnt look convincing.
I surf here in Scotland.
Nice experience on a good day if any surfers ever get to go here.

James.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 07-30-2007, 11:15 AM
Merlion's Avatar
Merlion Merlion is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Singapore
Posts: 3,716
Re: Artist defends surfing sculpture amid criticism

I did some online search on the artist Matthew Antichevich. Somehow I cannot find any information and pictures of his other figurative sculptures, and indeed of any sculptures. I tried the other spelling Anticevich, and still I find nothing. Perhaps others can give it a try.

Edit: I've found one site from a Gallery, see link below. It shows a few sculptures of surfers and waves, apparently small sizes. They look much better than the big one mentioned above. I show one below.

Trios Fine Art Gallery, Matthew Antichevich

__________________
Merlion
www.onesunartist.com

Last edited by Merlion : 07-30-2007 at 08:16 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 07-30-2007, 08:52 PM
fritchie's Avatar
fritchie fritchie is offline
Sculptor
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: New Orleans, LA
Posts: 3,456
Re: Artist defends surfing sculpture amid criticism

Merlion, the image in your post directly above is one of about five in the gallery link I posted in #8. These were models Antichevich submitted for the commission. I didn't notice or inquire whether the models are for sale. They DO show extraordinary and unnecessary amounts of bronze intended as foundation for the piece.

The Antichevich sculpture IS similar in hand placement to the image Underfoot gives in post 26 for the floater move, so IF the youngster really is experienced, that placement may be accurate. Even in this case though, I take the balance as wrong and the muscle tension as inaccurate.
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 07-30-2007, 09:43 PM
fritchie's Avatar
fritchie fritchie is offline
Sculptor
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: New Orleans, LA
Posts: 3,456
Re: Artist defends surfing sculpture amid criticism

Here's a brief excerpt from the San Diego Union Tribune newspaper, about the sculptor's background:

"Though he lives in Hemet, where he works with well-known sculptor Max DeMoss, Antichevich, 55, has said he is a lifelong surfer with a deep appreciation for the athleticism the sport demands and the spirituality it engenders.

He also has studied sculpture at the Florence Academy of Art, home of Michelangelo's “David,” itself an object of prurient speculation in some circles.

The Cardiff statue is Antichevich's maiden run as a public artist. His small statues are sold at the Trios Gallery in Solana Beach."

Re the "prurient" above, I omitted similar comment about this piece. I also should add that I have seen the figure's head from several additional angles, and it strikes me as fairly serious. I should modify my earlier comment that the expression is "silly".
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 07-30-2007, 10:09 PM
Merlion's Avatar
Merlion Merlion is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Singapore
Posts: 3,716
Re: Artist defends surfing sculpture amid criticism

Yes, Fritchie. You did post the link to the Gallery of the artist's small works first.

If this was his first attempt in doing a life-size figure sculpture, there are lessons to be learnt in this unfortunate story.
__________________
Merlion
www.onesunartist.com
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 07-30-2007, 10:48 PM
marblecutter's Avatar
marblecutter marblecutter is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: el paso texas
Posts: 432
Re: Artist defends surfing sculpture amid criticism

http://www.nctimes.com/articles/2007...2207194940.txt

Proud niece wrote on Jul 27, 2007 5:39 PM:

" I am very proud of my uncle who is the artist of this sculpture. He loves to surf and has taught his daughters, nephews, and nieces how to surf. His daughter (my cousin)taught my daughter how to surf. We have camped at San Elijo every summer together since I was a little girl. I am now going to be 30 in August. Don't make us have a bad memory of this place we have loved for so many years by being so mean and nasty. My uncle the artist, is a small town guy who has worked hard to provide the best for his daughters and put them through college. I am sure if he could afford to live near Cardiff he would. This is a a huge accomplishment in his career as an artist and art teacher. As far as I am concerned you are all acting like OC snobs. I am disappointed because I always enjoyed North San Diego atmosphere and people because I thought they were more down to earth. I guess I was wrong. I love you uncle Mathew. "
__________________
"Every time I make a mistake I fall into the abyss of learning something New"
claude montes
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 07-30-2007, 11:38 PM
GlennT's Avatar
GlennT GlennT is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 4,213
Re: Artist defends surfing sculpture amid criticism

That is sweet of the guy's niece to speak out as she did to defend him. And she is right that people should not be mean and nasty. By a like token, being a nice guy does not excuse bad art. Nor should having an artist who is a jerk exempt any great art from being appreciated. Were that the case, the incredible music of Wagner ( an anti-semnite ) and its far-reaching effects on the evolution of music would not have been available.

I have not gone so far as to say that this sculpture is bad art, but I have pointed out its defects. I thought is was very nicely modeled, but even that observation took a hit if it is in fact the product of body-casting. I would prefer to believe that he modeled it, and if it is cast, perhaps he did more to it after the fact, because the surfaces do not look as rigid and sterile as other body cast work I have seen. The face also is more interesting then a lot of over-modeled faces that one sees these days.

As for the pose, I don't buy the, " its a special, very difficult surfing manuever " line . For one thing, were that the case, then why does it depict a young beginner?
Secondly, as most surfers have recognized, the balance and the implied arm motions are not really accurate. If they were close, the surfers there would have reacted differently. I'm sure that they would actually be appreciative of a sculpture that did a good job of depicting the sport.
As Fritchie and others have pointed out, his small sculptures do a much better job of communicating surfing form.

There is a much better compromise possible between the bronze waves of the small work and what happened at full scale. The problem is not just the amount of bronze he used. What was used was not formed in a convincing way.

One thing is, the artist got a lot of people involved in talking about public art, sculpture, and surfing.

GlennT
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 07-31-2007, 12:08 PM
mountshang mountshang is offline
Level 8 user
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Chicago
Posts: 235
Re: Artist defends surfing sculpture amid criticism

I'm supposing that Richard McDonald is the sculptor whom most listers here would really like to see make this sculpture -- because he kind of specializes in athletic action figures -- and his piece would probably look more serious and masculine.

But here's my thinking about the sculpture that made for public spaces: it's first job is to honor that space -- so it's primary concern has to be as a piece of site-specific architecture.

It's very difficult to make an object which does that well -- and is also recognized as an attractive, healthy, inspirational human figure --- and that's why the sculptural tradition is so important -- i.e. as examples of past successes.

Within a typical sculptural tradition --- the thing to do is take a simple, standard figure and adapt it to the current situation.

So -- to honor a place of surfing -- you might pick a god/goddess that might be relevent (Neptune ? or some water nymph ?) and do a version that fits the site. The main idea is to make a beautiful, inspiring site -- the connection to surfing is an afterthought -- something there for those who want to study the details.

The problem with McDonald -- or any other current, prominent American sculptor who went to art school after 1950 (if at all) -- is that they'll give us all the details of anatomy and surfing -- but the piece itself will diminish the space that surrounds it. It will end up serving as nothing more than a curiosity.

That's why I said that I doubt anyone else would have done a better job.

The current piece shows "silly boys having fun" -- which seems to be fine for the local towns folk -- and is fine with me -- or at least is no worse than
"heroic athletes riding the waves" which I guess what the die-hard surfers want to see. (but I'm guessing that they're not the ones who paid for it)
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 07-31-2007, 04:46 PM
Kaffredrik Kaffredrik is offline
Level 1 user
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Sweden
Posts: 8
Re: Artist defends surfing sculpture amid criticism

Excuse me for taking this discussion back to the surfing-technique level: How the young man stands is quite similar to how I stood the first time a actually caught a wave... I fell backwards into the the wave, smiling and looking silly because it was my first wave and therefore a special experience. So, if the sculptor indeed tried to make a boy that is falling backwards into the wave then it is quite a nice pose. But who cares what I think, I don't even know if it is standing in the UK or USA and I've never made a huge bronze
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 07-31-2007, 09:05 PM
fritchie's Avatar
fritchie fritchie is offline
Sculptor
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: New Orleans, LA
Posts: 3,456
Re: Artist defends surfing sculpture amid criticism

Trying to get more material on the production of this Antichevich piece, I Googled the name of his apparent local coworker or support sculptor in the making of this surfer sculpture, Max DeMoss.

DeMoss' own website is http://www.maxdemoss.com, and there are many examples of his own work, but no lifesize, realistic pieces that I saw. DeMoss' work is widely represented across the U. S., and includes quite a bit of nonfiguration.

He has many figures posted, but in rather small scale, about 15 to 20 inches in max dimension. He also uses somewhat precious materials, including silver, and his bases include tall, thin granite "towers", like smaller versions of the Antichevich piece. I can see nothing here to indicate that DeMoss does bodycasts, or even to indicate that he is equipped for casting a lifesize figure.

Until more information is forthcoming, I'm inclined to keep an open mind on whether the surfer figure is bodycast or modeled. With Antichevich's reported contacts in Italy, it's even possible the work was modeled and cast there.
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 08-06-2007, 06:54 PM
Merlion's Avatar
Merlion Merlion is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Singapore
Posts: 3,716
Re: Artist defends surfing sculpture amid criticism

I know the story of this surfer sculpture would not end. This is a nice makeover. There is a video in this link, and the picture is bigger.

Pranksters Give Sculpture A Makeover

August 6, 2007, SAN DIEGO -- When a sculpture of a surfer was unveiled in Cardiff-by-the-Sea on July 23, many people immediately called it an eyesore. They said the sculpture, and more specifically the surfer's pose, didn't really represent the surfing community.


Some time on Sunday morning, some pranksters gave the $120,000 sculpture an unexpected makeover. The surfer was dressed up in a bikini top, a skirt and a Lucha Libre wrestling mask.

"I think it's better," said Ted Williams of Cardiff. "The people have spoken."....

No representatives were available to comment on the prank, but one resident said it is likely the beginning of a new tradition.

"I think this is the beginning of years and years of hazing," he said.
__________________
Merlion
www.onesunartist.com
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 08-06-2007, 07:51 PM
fritchie's Avatar
fritchie fritchie is offline
Sculptor
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: New Orleans, LA
Posts: 3,456
Re: Artist defends surfing sculpture amid criticism

Joking is (or can be) a form of acceptance. So long as it's not destructive ....
Reply With Quote
  #41  
Old 08-07-2007, 02:50 PM
heath's Avatar
heath heath is offline
Level 2 user
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 16
Re: Artist defends surfing sculpture amid criticism

I've been following this story as well, and I'm surprised so much of the attention is on the pose itself. I'll admit it feels a bit emasculating, but any sports moment caught at the right time could come across that way. (That begs the question, though... why, of all the possible poses, would you pick one so hula-dancer-like?).

Anyway, my main concern with the piece is the flying seeweed-on-a-static-column base for this. The artist has used the excuse that it wasn't his first choice -- there just wasn't enough budget. But that's no excuse. You design the work to fit the budget. Period. If the piece fails in some way due to a limited budget, then you failed in the planning phases.

My beef with this piece is that it looks stuck up there. Stranded. The base can never be ignored.. especially one so integral to the work. If they didn't have the money to do the wave right, they should have taken a different approach.

Glenn... I don't know you, but I take exception to your attitude that an artist must make whatever little money he has to in order to pull a piece off. If you have your act together, you can design a successful piece that fits within the budget and still make a decent living off it.

People that are willing to give clients a $100,000 piece for $50,000 drag us all down by lowering the value of our work. It's understandable for a kid just starting out to make 50 cents an hour on a piece -- just to get some work out there -- but once you've reached a level where you're playing with the big boys, if you are making $5-$20 an hour on your work, you are doing something very, very wrong, and you're harming the entire artist community by underselling your work.
__________________
- Heath

publicsculpture.com
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 08-07-2007, 10:38 PM
GlennT's Avatar
GlennT GlennT is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 4,213
Re: Artist defends surfing sculpture amid criticism

Heath:

We are addressing two issues here:

1. just compensation for an artist
2. doing the best work possible no matter the circumstances

I'm not suggesting that an artist should undersell their work. But I am saying that in a public work, or a permanent medium, the bottom line should be the integrity of the art. An artist who prefers personal comfort to doing a job right, if those are the choices, does more harm to the artistic community than those who make personal sacrifices.

The money comes and goes, but the art remains.

GlennT
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 08-08-2007, 12:11 AM
heath's Avatar
heath heath is offline
Level 2 user
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 16
Re: Artist defends surfing sculpture amid criticism

Quote:
Originally Posted by GlennT
Heath:
I'm not suggesting that an artist should undersell their work. But I am saying that in a public work, or a permanent medium, the bottom line should be the integrity of the art.
I was mostly reacting to your line, "...am I the oddball for working for next to nothing sometimes in order to do the job right?"

Maybe I misinterpreted that. But in the context of this sculpture being discussed, it's way beyond putting in an extra day or two to modify something that didn't come out right the first time, this is just bad planning... cramming a rock underneath the sculpture instead of a wave because there wasn't enough budget. If there wasn't enough budget, a different approach should have been taken.

If you work for next to nothing at times because you make mistakes while working on the piece, that's one thing. I've been lucky in that I've been able to avoid that sort of mistake for a good decade now. Live and learn.

But I thought (I guess mistakenly) that the suggestion was that he should have worked for next to nothing to do the piece as it was intended. I disagree in that if the people paying for the work gave him a budget to work with, he should have designed something that worked within that budget and still earned him a good living.

If they slashed the budget after the initial proposal, he should have told them he needed to start the design process from scratch or raise more money -- not hammer a round peg into a square hole by chucking a rock under it, and then use the lack of budget as an excuse for its weaknesses.
__________________
- Heath

publicsculpture.com
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 08-28-2007, 03:51 AM
Merlion's Avatar
Merlion Merlion is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Singapore
Posts: 3,716
Re: Artist defends surfing sculpture amid criticism

This bronze monument is still in the news, this times including the LA Times. It has really been a nightmare for the artist Antichevich. There are lessons we can learnt from his bad experience.

We don't have the complete picture of course. These points below are what I can gather from digesting the many online articles.

This is the first monument he made. It may well be his first life-size bronze figure. It is for his local district paid very much out of donations from the local community. Thus their expectations are high.

He won the commission bid, but the fund is insufficient for show the surfing wave as bronze. The latter is quite well done in his small size bronze shown in a earlier post #30.

The figure seems, but not confirmed, to be a body cast. It resulted in the posture, and the hand and leg positions wrongly placed for real exciiting surfing which is what the proud local surfers would like to see.

In a way I take pity on him, a fellow sculptor, as I am not sure if he could continue to face his local community after this nightmare.

A wave of disapproval greets Cardiff surf statue

August 27, 2007, CARDIFF-BY-THE-SEA, Calif. -- The idea was to have a public sculpture to celebrate the surfing zeitgeist of this San Diego suburb, home to some of the region's best surf breaks.

Local boosters, who collected donations to hire an artist, dreamed of a surf sculpture like those in Santa Cruz and Huntington Beach -- or even like the most famous statue of all, of the legendary Duke Kahanamoku in Waikiki.

Alas, it hasn't worked out that way. Boosters hoped for cowabunga but got a wipeout instead.

Since its unveiling amid civic hoopla three weeks ago, the sculpture, titled "Magic Carpet Ride," has been a target of anger and ridicule from local surfers. ...

The sculptor, Matthew Antichevich, who lives in Hemet and teaches at Mt. San Jacinto College, said he doesn't mind some aesthetic criticism but has been taken aback by the vitriol. ....

"It's been a learning experience," Antichevich said. "It was my first monument. Hopefully, it [the controversy] will simmer down."
__________________
Merlion
www.onesunartist.com

Last edited by Merlion : 08-28-2007 at 05:15 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 08-28-2007, 05:49 AM
heath's Avatar
heath heath is offline
Level 2 user
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 16
Re: Artist defends surfing sculpture amid criticism

Dude bit off more than he could chew.

I've grown the scale of my work a step at a time -- I always try to take on something just a bit more than I think I can easily handle, so I'll grow. But going from desk-sized bronzes to full-scale public art was a mistake both for the people that commissioned the work and the artist himself.

Would you have someone build your home when the biggest project they've done is a garden shed?
__________________
- Heath

publicsculpture.com
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old 08-28-2007, 01:05 PM
Alfred's Avatar
Alfred Alfred is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Pomona, California
Posts: 454
Re: Artist defends surfing sculpture amid criticism

This is the first time I'm posting anything in this discussion, but I've been following this story. I know a man who is quite good at getting public art created. He also runs an organization for youth water sports (including surfing). I created a design for a surf monument over a year ago for a different project. There was no specific call for entries but it started a discussion about public sculpture at that location, and it had my name at the top of the list. That job has yet to be completed and may not have any public art at all, when it's all said and done.

This guy contacted me last week and told me he's trying to speak with the mayor of Cardiff and wants to propose my surfing sculpture as a replacement for this one. I'm not really sure that that is the best idea. There's far too much contreversy already and I think it would put a harsh light on anything I created. My concept is really good and has won the approval of local surfers in Laguna Beach. However, I think that replacing the work goes too far, and I'd hate to be the artist that gets put in it's place.

I'm starting on the maquette however, because I do feel that it's a good design and I think it would do well elsewhere, or as smaller gallery sculpture. I'm in no way a surfer, I used to boogey board when I was younger but that is the extent of my expertice. However, I feel that it doesn't take a surfer to create a good surf sculpture. It requires a sculptor who is willing to do the research and bring in surfers as models so that they will know what poses are true to the sport. In the project I mentioned earlier, there was a town meeting to discuss the placement of a sculptural monument at that site. I got some flack for not being a surfer, but I retorted with the fact that I was a sculptor, and afterall if you're going to do a sculpture - hire a sculptor. They wanted to hire surfers who were also artists, but their designs were mediocre and it was only because they were local surfers that they were even considered. In the case of the Cardiff sculpture, the guy says he is a life-long surfer, but maybe he should have been a life-long sculptor.

Alfred
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 08-28-2007, 03:28 PM
GlennT's Avatar
GlennT GlennT is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 4,213
Re: Artist defends surfing sculpture amid criticism

Alfred: That is a tough call. It appears that your integrity and commitment to excellence is guiding you the right way. It is a hard and humiliating thing for that artist to have his work replaced. Hopefully it will serve in the long run to motivate him to become a better artist.

If you do end up creating the new and improved piece, your responsibility in the short term becomes as a teacher demonstrating how to do things the right way ( not with pride, just competance ). But this is not really about the other artist. In the long term, it is the opportunity to create a public work of art that will inspire others. That alone makes it worth doing.

good fortune,

GlennT
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 08-28-2007, 04:41 PM
sculptor's Avatar
sculptor sculptor is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: IOWA
Posts: 1,493
Re: Artist defends surfing sculpture amid criticism

question

We still do not have a definitive answer as to whether or not the surfer by Antichevich was cast from life or modeled?

Anyone got a real botom line on this one?
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 08-28-2007, 05:22 PM
heath's Avatar
heath heath is offline
Level 2 user
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 16
Re: Artist defends surfing sculpture amid criticism

I don't do cast work, but if the final piece is what it it is... that is to say, if the final piece works or doesn't work, does it really matter if it's a life cast or not?

I can see how a life cast requires less technical skill, of course, but if the end goal is a successful piece and you pull that off, does it matter?

This is an honest question... I've never felt the end product should be defined by the process (or what the artist says the piece is about, for that matter). The end product should be defined by what you see and experience.

Now, when the process shows somehow in the end work in a negative, of course the process matters... but that's because the wrong (or weaker) process was chosen for that particular work, not because it really matters at all, if the piece is successful.

I'm having a hard time explaining myself on this. Argh.

Let's say this: I don't care, for example, if you carve a statue from stone with a toothpick or a power hammer if the end result is the same. I think it's quite an impressive feat to do it with a toothpick, and quite foolish as well, but that does not make the end piece better in my mind if you set the works side-by-side and can see no difference.

I'm not impressed with how much work one puts into a work, I'm impressed with the end result. In fact, the more efficient you are, the more impressed I am...
__________________
- Heath

publicsculpture.com
Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old 08-28-2007, 07:07 PM
fritchie's Avatar
fritchie fritchie is offline
Sculptor
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: New Orleans, LA
Posts: 3,456
Re: Artist defends surfing sculpture amid criticism

I've more or less liked the original work from the beginning, not being a surfer, but I hope an artist. It really doesn't bother me if the arms and hands don't express what local surfers say is correct or authentic, or even sculptors from elsewhere. I, like GlennT, commend you for your sensitivity and integrity on this issue, Alfred.

However, I think it would be a mistake for the local community to yield to what more or less is mob pressure. This is not unlike a public lynching, the use of group "justice" in older times where calmer heads failed to respond to real needs.

If the community eventually does decide it wants another piece, I hope a permanent home with good exhibit conditions is found for the original work.

And, I more or less agree with Heath on the lifecast issue. If it's a good piece, the process is of little importance to me.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


Sculpture Community, Sculpture.net
International Sculpture Center, Sculpture.org
vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Russ RuBert