Sculpture Community - Sculpture.net  

Go Back  Sculpture Community - Sculpture.net > Sculpture Roundtable Discussions > Sculpture focus topics
User Name
Password
Home Sculpture Community Photo Gallery ISC Sculpture.org Register FAQ Members List Search New posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 09-17-2008, 06:31 AM
furby furby is offline
Level 9 user
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: australia
Posts: 286
IS the life of a painter easier? and other stuff

Hey all,

Yeah i was invited to the house of a painter the other evening. I went there with no preconceptions i just went there to meet up & say hi to someone i had seen around in galleries a bit but had never thought about where they work/live. He's a successful painter, as successful as you get. I was blown out by such a nice old house with hidden huge yard with a magnificent studio, right in the middle of town. But mainly what knocked me out was all the work! Every square foot of wall in the house was covered by paintings. Not all were his, all sorts of people's paintings & quite a few sculptures around the place. My visit got me thinking on several lines...

firstly... i wonder where did i f' up that i still have not even got a studio, let alone a place to live of my own... i am saving up a deposit on something, so i got hopes for one day maybe - but you know like in the meantime i got no studio. it would be lovely to have a place where only i go. painters can much easier rent studios, cos they don't use angle grinders & make massive clouds of dust & mud. as soon as i mention what i'm going to do there.. it becomes "well no.."

2ndly... as a sculptor, or any artist, making stuff is the way to get good at it, practice & work is what it takes. But even if you keep them small, they are all 3d, you don't have the same ability to wallpaper your house with them or stack them like you can with 2d stuff. So do painters have it easier? but i still don't want to be a painter even if i could.

thirdly... a mixture of the 2 above things.. why am i sitting here surfing the net, instead of sculpting... cos i don't have a studio with lights & armchairs & SPACE maybe? or is it just my lack of willpower? what i need is to be alone in quiet, which is an impossible thing where i live. But if i made something every day - what a great idea! i'd need to throw most of it away afterwards, cos 7 new sculptures a week might be a bit much. But is that bad?

anyway just some thoughts... meaningless. but i did really enjoy visiting & seeing how a successful artist lives, an eye-opener. hopefully it'll get me out of my rut.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 09-17-2008, 09:30 AM
jOe~'s Avatar
jOe~ jOe~ is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Spokane, Wa
Posts: 3,190
Re: IS the life of a painter easier? and other stuff

Of course painters have it easier. Next comes acoustic musicians, writers, then singers and dancers. But if the art vampire has replaced all your blood with sculpture fluid, what to do?
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 09-19-2008, 06:22 AM
furby furby is offline
Level 9 user
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: australia
Posts: 286
Re: IS the life of a painter easier? and other stuff

Musicians have it fleetingly though... they make the sound & then its gone. I know a singer who feels a bit weird like that. I kinda prefer to make things that last a little while, myself, but wow i would love to be able to play some music.

BTW sorry i think i put this thread in the wrong category... but i started out writing something completely different that actually was about sculpture..

have fallen into a bit of a depression. i dunno, i guess i'm having YET another mid life crisis. i think its cos i finished the commissioned work i been doing & that was all consuming, maybe i feel a bit lost.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 09-19-2008, 08:31 AM
Ironlady's Avatar
Ironlady Ironlady is offline
Level 5 user
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Ashevegas
Posts: 81
Re: IS the life of a painter easier? and other stuff

drat that art vampire! i'm doomed!
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 09-19-2008, 09:23 AM
chris 71's Avatar
chris 71 chris 71 is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: ont canada
Posts: 1,054
Re: IS the life of a painter easier? and other stuff

http://www.sculpture.net/community/s...ead.php?t=7978
hi furby depression sucks here is a thread with some good reads one i liked in particular is
freedom from drive or passion is a rare gift
freedom from desire or hunger is a rare gift

kick back and enjoy your gifts as they present themselves
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 09-19-2008, 11:08 AM
grommet grommet is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 4,279
Re: IS the life of a painter easier? and other stuff

Time to nurture that idea you pushed aside because you said it would be procrastinating. Indulge yourself and go with the flow. It recharges the batteries. Getting the blood flowing is good too. Go see what the kids are doing that usually come to see what you are doing.

Do musicians have fewer storage issues? What does their 'boneyard' look like?
__________________
Taking my own advice
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 09-19-2008, 11:34 AM
evaldart's Avatar
evaldart evaldart is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: easthampton, massachusetts
Posts: 5,637
Re: IS the life of a painter easier? and other stuff

Musicians have wonderful boneyards. Almost as heavy as a sculptor's if they're makin any decent noise (Marshall stacks and Hammond B-3's rival our welding machines in wieght). Plus, the same "acquiring nature" that afflicts us sculptors posesses most musicians. Ineveitably they will have many, many instruments that they love - but that they don't play or are hopelessly broken. The attachment to these "objects" is very similar to our attachment to a big special rock or a crumpled steel beam. They are as dependent on these"tools" as we are in the the pursuit their pertinence. If sculpture became illegal tomorrow, I'd definitely punish them double with my music...so those damn regulars better just leave me alone.

Of course, musicians have their poets too...acoustic transient protesters with big messages and small appetites and no boneyard.

Last edited by evaldart : 09-20-2008 at 06:16 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 09-19-2008, 01:35 PM
jOe~'s Avatar
jOe~ jOe~ is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Spokane, Wa
Posts: 3,190
Re: IS the life of a painter easier? and other stuff

All artists of all varieties have bone yards. For some its all in their heads--the worst kind because they have to lug it around all the time. Like from the Devo song--its a swelling itching brain.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 09-19-2008, 02:36 PM
grommet grommet is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 4,279
Re: IS the life of a painter easier? and other stuff

That's when JK Rowling's "pensive" would be handy...
__________________
Taking my own advice
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 09-20-2008, 05:57 AM
furby furby is offline
Level 9 user
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: australia
Posts: 286
Re: IS the life of a painter easier? and other stuff

You all rock
Thanks for the kind words.

I'm going to go make a Bad Sculpture...
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 09-20-2008, 11:54 AM
Alfred's Avatar
Alfred Alfred is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Pomona, California
Posts: 454
Re: IS the life of a painter easier? and other stuff

Hey Furby, the majority of my friends (outside of cyberspace) are painters, and most of them are quite successful at what they do. I've talked about this very thing with them before and we sometimes get into a debate, but ultimately I win because it's true that painters have it easier than sculptors. The way I explain it to them is (this only related to those of us who have to cast their work to get the final result) A sculptor has to create the original sculpture, which sometimes goes through the process of sketches and moquettes. Then there is the mold and the wax copy, which then has to be cleaned up and sometimes further details added to areas that were hard to reach before. After that comes the bronze which has to be chased and re- textured in the areas of the welds. Finally, there's the patina... which can be the life or death of a sculpture if done poorly. All in all, a sculptor has to create their work 3 different times just to arrive at the final sculpture (that's not including the sketches and moquettes). A painter creates their work once and it's done. Sure some paintings take longer than others, but they still only have to do it once.

Then there's the matter of real-estate. A sculpture demands space in your home. It lives among you and forces you to move around it. A painting is relegated to the walls and places no such demands on your environment. This is a crucial difference when it comes to being successful. Paintings are much easier because they cover wall space. A person can put five or six paintings on one wall (depending on their size), but they couldn't put five or six sculptures along one wall. Even if the sculptures were the same size of the paintings (in width and height). Mainly because the sculptures would demand too much space into the room. and steel away valuable real-estate for the home owner. Paintings also cost less because of the process involved. Sculpture has a lot of overhead built into the process. This is another way for painters to do well. They can crank out a painting (especially the "contemporary" painters I've seen recently) sometimes taking only a matter of hours to finish a work. But the cost of the painting is not reflective of the time put into it. A sculpture not only has to cover the raw materials, but the process involved in producing those raw materials into sculpture.

Even knowing all this I still choose to make sculpture, because it's what drives me the most. I draw and paint on occasion, but it's sculpture that always calls me back to the studio. And I do tend to make a lot of stuff that I just destroy after making. I take pictures, but that's the only record that exists of my work. I probably only cast about 20% of what I make, because most of it is done just for the fun and challenge of sculpting. People who draw and paint can put 1000 creations into the space I use for a model stand, but I'm limited to however much flat, open space I have available in my studio (and that's not much).

Alfred
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 09-23-2008, 05:53 AM
furby furby is offline
Level 9 user
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: australia
Posts: 286
Re: IS the life of a painter easier? and other stuff

Hey Alfred

yeah i wouldn't swap it to be a painter. like my dad says (old country saying): "i wouldn't give it for a hatful of sh*t"; i.e. i wouldn't trade for it.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 10-13-2008, 05:16 PM
chris 71's Avatar
chris 71 chris 71 is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: ont canada
Posts: 1,054
Re: IS the life of a painter easier? and other stuff

just thought i share a little recent experince i have 4 small carvings at a locale gallery where they sold one for me a while back. they just had a show for a painter some nice landscape oil paintings. opening night of the show they sold 7 of the 9 paintings all around the 3000 dollar mark. the gallery owners told me it would be a great time for my carvings to be seen and maybe sell. so there they sit my 4 little carvings each priced at 700 dollars much less than the paintings but notta one sold. i am aware that the painter is a established artist unlike myself but i did think just for a moment man i which i knew how to paint so it goes i guess
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 10-13-2008, 06:09 PM
chris 71's Avatar
chris 71 chris 71 is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: ont canada
Posts: 1,054
Re: IS the life of a painter easier? and other stuff

just checked there was 16 paintings not 9 sorry
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 10-14-2008, 10:27 AM
blacksmithstris's Avatar
blacksmithstris blacksmithstris is offline
Level 2 user
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Scotland/Canada
Posts: 13
Re: IS the life of a painter easier? and other stuff

I would say a resounding... YES!

As sculptors we are working in a whole other dimension to our fellow painters....!
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 10-14-2008, 12:53 PM
sculptor's Avatar
sculptor sculptor is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: IOWA
Posts: 1,493
Re: IS the life of a painter easier? and other stuff

Quote:
As sculptors we are working in a whole other dimension to our fellow painters....!
and being as you were a painter and now follow the path of blacksmithstris and sculptor

which begs the question:
Now that you're a sculptor,
do you feel you have more depth, are more robust, and, perhaps just a tad less colorful?
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 10-15-2008, 04:27 AM
blacksmithstris's Avatar
blacksmithstris blacksmithstris is offline
Level 2 user
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Scotland/Canada
Posts: 13
Re: IS the life of a painter easier? and other stuff

Oh Dear Sculptor,

Are you really suggesting that one assumes the title of sculptor and therefore defaults to losing their colour/hue/saturation settings and becomes guilty of extradimensional monochrome?
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 10-15-2008, 06:09 AM
whittler whittler is offline
Level 2 user
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Scotland
Posts: 13
Re: IS the life of a painter easier? and other stuff

How many painters sculpt? How many sculptors paint?
I do both and have twice as much stuff and still no studio
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 10-15-2008, 11:53 AM
sculptor's Avatar
sculptor sculptor is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: IOWA
Posts: 1,493
Re: IS the life of a painter easier? and other stuff

I consider some painters to be gifted magicians, who by the use of color, tone, and hue are able to achieve a feeling of depth, and capture human feelings in a way that sculptures rarely do.

Whereas color is the beginning and end of painting, many sculptors think of it only as something within the protective coating they use to protect their sculptures from the elements.

Many miss the altogether greater effect achieved by tonal changes which could enhance the creation.

Extradimensional monochromites repent. Seek yee the enhancements of color and hue to the greater glory of your art.

patination anyone?
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


Sculpture Community, Sculpture.net
International Sculpture Center, Sculpture.org
vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Russ RuBert