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  #1  
Old 02-23-2008, 12:03 PM
mountshang mountshang is offline
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Gallery of Romantic Realism

http://www.cordair.com/sculptures.htm


I hate this style -- but still -- I'm glad there's a gallery devoted to it.
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  #2  
Old 02-23-2008, 04:26 PM
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GlennT GlennT is offline
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Re: Gallery of Romantic Realism

There is a painter on the website whose masterful work is worth taking a look at: Han Wu Shen.
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  #3  
Old 02-23-2008, 08:42 PM
Giotto Giotto is offline
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Re: Gallery of Romantic Realism

This is what I call Contemporary Figurative Gallery art. I don't put it down it's just that it's a commercial product and if I were younger and had to earn a living I would be cranking it out...much easier than what I am trying to do..

G

PS Gallery of Romantic realism..very funny Mountshang
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  #4  
Old 02-23-2008, 08:50 PM
Giotto Giotto is offline
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Re: Gallery of Romantic Realism

PSS ....you have to admit Danielle Anjou is a major babe....I know she is capable of much more than the stilted white bread figures I see on this website...like "The shot put" or as I like to call him "Man with one great big ball"

G
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  #5  
Old 02-23-2008, 10:48 PM
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racine racine is offline
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Re: Gallery of Romantic Realism

looking at the paintings it occured to me that this could be an alternate earth where the camera hadnt been invented
this is not meant in a negative sense as i find the idea rather compelling
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  #6  
Old 02-24-2008, 10:48 AM
ironman ironman is offline
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Re: Gallery of Romantic Realism

I am so sorry that I clicked on that web site, it ruined my day!!!!!!!!!!
Jeff
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  #7  
Old 02-24-2008, 11:18 AM
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Re: Gallery of Romantic Realism

There were real romantics back when that mattered, late nineteenth century. Poets, painters, sculptors who utilized odd beauties and pained embellishings to to deliver their messages of ire, confusion, ecstacy and bewilderment. That period led us to modern thinking where it was finally understood that the odd beauties needn't be there at all because the confusion and bewilderment was more than enough.
I think "Romantic" is not the right category for this work. Of course it has some well-handed illustrative qualities and might be wonderful additions to some opulences out there, but "neo-romanicism"?...nah.
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  #8  
Old 02-24-2008, 01:33 PM
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Re: Gallery of Romantic Realism

Wow, I didn't expect to see such responses... well maybe a few from the normal haters of anything figurative. I know that alot of the titles and themes are kind of trite, but some of the figures work quite well.

Martin Eichinger's "Daydream", "All down hill from here", and "Bringing down the house", I think are good examples of fine figurative sculpture. Even "Lotus Blossum" has it's appeal (and a very well sculpted female form)

Danielle Anjou, aside from being a major babe (which I agree completly with) she also has a good eye for form and movement. "Neptune", the "Titans" and the "Gymnast" are good examples. She also obviously has an Olympic theme for alot of her work. The "hammer thrower" is a good sculpt of such a difficult moment to capture. If you've seen a better hammer thrower then share... I'd like to see it, or if you've sculpted a better one yourself. Giotto, I know you said you're not putting it down, but you also said what you're doing is harder. Are you speaking of the themes or emotional connections, or of the sculptural ability. I'm curious to know what your work looks like.

Sandra Shaw, is obviously influenced by Art Neuvou and Art Deco. But she still has some wonderful examples of figuraive sculpture. "My Kitten", The "Michaelangelo Bust" and "Love" are really good pieces.

Jay Hall Carpenter has a couple of good ones like "Icarus" and "Youth".

Romantic Realism....Maybe not, certainly idealized...perhaps that makes it romantic? I don't know. But if this work makes you cringe, then maybe I shouldn't share my work here anymore. I've shared extensively and have always recieved a possitive response to my work, but I could very well see myself in the same galley space as these artists. I'm not sure what the difference is. I understand non-figurative sculptors always getting down on us figurative sculptors, I've come to expect from most of the ones I know personally. But it seems like the appreciation of talent and a well sculpted figure has gone down dramatically.

Then again...just all of you here, it's just my opinion of the work. Maybe I've got my head in the clouds.

Alfred
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  #9  
Old 02-24-2008, 02:24 PM
Giotto Giotto is offline
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Re: Gallery of Romantic Realism

Alfread......please ignore everything I say. It's my belief that art ended with the Romantic movement. i.e. thoughts, feelings and imagination taking precedence over rational thought. Here is example by Fuslie.

As for a better hammer thrower.... Here is one the the great much overlooked sculptors of our time Pablo Eduardo.

Alfred my objection with the gallery works is that while they show great technical skill and natural talent I find very little inspiration....

G
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  #10  
Old 02-24-2008, 02:33 PM
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GlennT GlennT is offline
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Re: Gallery of Romantic Realism

As a figurative sculptor who is obviously in support of figurative sculpture, I may be able to help here. I will focus not on the good pieces there, of which there are a number, but the negative attributes of the whole, so i may perhaps put into words what others may be responding to.

There is no question about the anatomical modeling skills, which seems to be the chief attraction of many works. However, the poses for the most part look like the models, or the artist, are saying, " Ta Da!!! Here I am in this stretchy, difficult pose, with my perfect muscles, blowy hair, and chiseled picture-perfect facial features with little significant human character. How perfect am I?"

Then there is Bill Mack, Mr. Sex Sells, proclaiming himself the world master of bas-relief. Indeed, in his own world, he is the master. Fortunately, there is another world, inhabited by the rest of us, where there are many great artists who do excellent work. Their art speaks quietly and enduringly for itself without such loudly shouting shallowness.

Sandra Shaw seems for the most part to avoid the tendancy of others to overmodel many of the works suffer from. That is the problem of the camera view, which emphasizes all details at the same sharpness, so that a fingernail or the texture of cloth is as significant as the idea. When there is not much of an idea, then why not show how well one can model these details?

Karl Jensen has some good works where the character of the model is well developed and emphasized, rather than lost as in many of the other sculptors. I'm not fond of his "Loveland school" types of patinas, preferring Shaw's and Danielle Anjou's approach much better. I can understand why some people would find his children work "too sweet", but I find his work more real and sincere than others who do similar subjects without his depth, and which give that genre a bad taste.

I would like to see those who think that any of this work is simple, easy, or inferior to their own show us something better. I have given some critque here in order to indicate what areas could stand for improvement, in my opinion. Better is out there, but there is also a lot of effort that goes into many of these works that I don't think should be cavalierly discounted. The world of art as a whole does not conform to my view of how it should be, but I can appreciate aspects of all of these artist's works, (even Bill Mack) and I am glad that there are people still appreciating the expression of the human form in an age that often seeks to relegate it to belonging only in the past.
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  #11  
Old 02-24-2008, 02:56 PM
Giotto Giotto is offline
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Re: Gallery of Romantic Realism

I can go to my local digitizer and have models scanned into these poses and reproduced in any size you like...so what is the point of endless "woman with wings"...."muscle guy looking off into the distance" ..."single figure nude" etc etc.? In my humble opinion it's what's in your heart and soul that is uniquely yours that is important. I personally find technical skill the easiest part...it's much harder to look inside and find truth..this is why I find the romantic movement in art literature and even science so compelling.

G
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  #12  
Old 02-24-2008, 03:09 PM
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evaldart evaldart is offline
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Re: Gallery of Romantic Realism

Thanks for that hammer thrower Giotto...a very inspirational piece of figuration. Aint it great...everyday you learn about one new thing, and forget two old things.
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  #13  
Old 02-24-2008, 03:15 PM
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chris 71 chris 71 is offline
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Re: Gallery of Romantic Realism

i think these are truly awesome and only wish to someday be able to sculpt like these pepeole. Iam still trying to figure out all this art talk. when i read alot of the stuff on these forums. Are alot of the seemingly displeaseing vibes because this type of art is already done is it only good when its something new? or are these people being compared to the best that ever lived?
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  #14  
Old 02-24-2008, 04:54 PM
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jOe~ jOe~ is offline
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Re: Gallery of Romantic Realism

Quote:
Iam still trying to figure out all this art talk.
Forget about learning the art talk and learn to sculpt what moves you. Making is much more rewarding , in every way imaginable, than arguing.
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  #15  
Old 02-24-2008, 05:27 PM
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fritchie fritchie is offline
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Re: Gallery of Romantic Realism

For the most part, I agree with GlennT's fairly brief descriptions of good and poor features in this group of works. As for a name, I'd call it "Any Sculpture that Sells", or "Sculpture for the Interior Decorator".

For lack of a better term, I'll say the works here mostly lack soul. That is, sort of following GlennT, the sculptors seem to be more concerned with displaying ability in finishing and patina than they are with any sense of individuality in the works. Loveland in many ways fits this mold, and also many of the Albuquerque galleries. Not to worry, Alfred. Your work is clouds above most of this.

I do think the world has a hunger for figurative work, as for other types, but only if it's work meaningful to the artist and not principally for the market.
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  #16  
Old 02-24-2008, 05:32 PM
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chris 71 chris 71 is offline
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Re: Gallery of Romantic Realism

your right joe i don't want to argue with any of you guys you'd argue figure eights around me all day just trying to understand chris.
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  #17  
Old 02-25-2008, 09:33 AM
mountshang mountshang is offline
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Re: Gallery of Romantic Realism

Here's the reasons I like this work:

*It's positive -- trying to show healthy, happy bodies
*It's completely outside the discourses of the contemporary art world and its academic support system


Here's why I hate it:

It's ugly.

I suppose more detailed explanations could be given for each piece -- but overall the problem is that everyone here is thinking too much about the object of mimesis-- and too little about the visual effect of the piece itself -- i.e. the design of form and mass in space.

In other words -- these are doll makers rather than sculptors -- and deserve the same indictment which Laredo Taft delivered on the popular styles of his time, the late 19th C.:


"the puerile effronteries of these harlequins,
delighting through their very ineptitude a public avid of new sensations."



There's nothing wrong with making highly detailed sculpture that show beautiful young men or women dancing or twisting in space -- but that can be done well -- or not.

Example of success: Carpeaux
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  #18  
Old 02-25-2008, 10:38 AM
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Re: Gallery of Romantic Realism

Quote:
Originally Posted by fritchie View Post
For the most part, I agree with GlennT's fairly brief descriptions of good and poor features in this group of works. As for a name, I'd call it "Any Sculpture that Sells", or "Sculpture for the Interior Decorator".

For lack of a better term, I'll say the works here mostly lack soul. That is, sort of following GlennT, the sculptors seem to be more concerned with displaying ability in finishing and patina than they are with any sense of individuality in the works. Loveland in many ways fits this mold, and also many of the Albuquerque galleries. Not to worry, Alfred. Your work is clouds above most of this.

I do think the world has a hunger for figurative work, as for other types, but only if it's work meaningful to the artist and not principally for the market.
Well said Fritchie, all of it.
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  #19  
Old 02-25-2008, 12:17 PM
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Alfred Alfred is offline
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Re: Gallery of Romantic Realism

Well said by all, I have to say I am convinced of your arguments and I guess I was intuitevly passing up all that work and only looking at the ones I liked.

Giotto, thanks for the hammer thrower, clearly a better (more moving) example. I too find that sculpting anatomically correct figures is not the end of the line. Emotion and heart are a big part of it. But sometimes I'm swept up in good compostion. It's why I like alot of MacDonald's newer work. Good composition sometimes clouds my mind from seeing the lack of geniun feeling and emotion.

Fritchie, Thanks for the compliment. I hope that with the new work that is under way, I can continue to impress.

Alfred
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  #20  
Old 02-25-2008, 12:44 PM
Giotto Giotto is offline
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Re: Gallery of Romantic Realism

For Alfred
Here is a better view....look how his eyes are closed and face relaxed while muscles are tensed..there is a spiritual quality to his expression....and the steep angle of his head...his legs suggests massiveness with out showing every muscle God gave him....Pablo Eduardo is a beautiful man.
http://www.hammerthrow.com/images/photos/statue.jpg

If you go back and compare to Anjou's work. I get the sense the figure would fall over backward if not bolted down. The work is "good" but the essence of the calm brutality and power necessary for throwing the hammer just isn't there. The anatomy isn't "real" ....hammer throwers don't look like that. Also the figure is gratuitously shown nude...like an ancient Olympic sport but the hammer wasn't invented then (it's scottish) and I think it distracts from the composition.
http://www.cordair.com/anjou/hammer.php

G
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  #21  
Old 02-25-2008, 12:51 PM
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Re: Gallery of Romantic Realism

ok i think iam starting to get it now there is a huge difference between the two hammer throwers i guess i was just immedeatly impressed with the tecnical skill
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  #22  
Old 02-26-2008, 04:25 AM
furby furby is offline
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Re: Gallery of Romantic Realism

You guys rock... i couldn't figure out why those sculptures attracted & repulsed me at the same time, but you all put in in words. Its something i been worrying over for years.

They're physically perfect & we can all appreciate that in a figure, yet only that perfection is the reason for their existence, there's nothing further in them. Its technical skill pushed to the limit thats admirable, but its pretty soulless. I reckon most sculptors got the itch to make something that breathes & lives but then some things breathe & live & have also a spirit without it being entirely superficially visible.
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