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  #1  
Old 11-23-2006, 07:11 PM
maxduro maxduro is offline
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A new sculpture is born

HI all,

I am just posting a few images of my first figurative sculpture here to receive a bit of feedback before finalizing it. It is made of paperclay. I loved working with paperclay and I like how it is possible to smooth the surface with a sponge at the end.

Thanks for any comment and suggestion.
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  #2  
Old 11-24-2006, 04:37 AM
DanielUCM DanielUCM is offline
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Re: A new sculpture is born

Hi!

If this is your first figurative sculpture its going to be really interesting to see what you will be capable off in the long run! I'm not in a position to give you any advice but I think that those here who are would like to see photos of the model taken in the same views as the sculpture.
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  #3  
Old 11-24-2006, 12:28 PM
mountshang mountshang is offline
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Re: A new sculpture is born

What do you think about it yourself ? (i.e. -- how does it compare -- on the various points that concern you -- with the examples of portrait sculpture that you enjoy the most ?)
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  #4  
Old 11-24-2006, 12:58 PM
maxduro maxduro is offline
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Re: A new sculpture is born

to be honest, with this sculpture I wanted to accomplish 2 things. Obtain a portrait that was resemblant of the model and which satisfied me estetically. Both were big issues because I had to overtake all the tecnical problems due to the fact that it was my first sculpture. So, i don.t know, from understanding how the clay would have worked under my hands to chosing the more appropriate way to mantain good proportions and correspondence to the anatomical traits of the model or how to use the tools, and so on. Moreover I tried not to fall in the trap of a mere technicism and I wanted to make a rapresentation of the model which underlined or showed her best somatic traits and an overall good expression. It has not been easy so far cause the problems I faced have been many during this sculpting (which I do no consider yet terminated).

Regarding my favourite sculptors, I just intentionally tried to not to replicate what I like of them and I forced myself to find my own way of representing all the things that make this sculpture. I wanted something that was realistic but at the same time a bit idealized or to say better "realistically filtered with my mind and my eyes". Well at least this is the mental process that I tried to apply. During the final phases of the sculpting I simply stopped referring to the images and pictures and started to model the details as i remembered, and reproduce them as they were in my memory.

Now the sculpture is "resting" under the wrap, and I just want to take few days without working on it in order to look at it with fresh eyes and see if I still like it.

not sure I answered you. However
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  #5  
Old 11-24-2006, 07:08 PM
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fritchie fritchie is offline
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Re: A new sculpture is born

I find it very well done, astonishingly well-done for a first piece. Also, I think you are wise to put it aside for a short time, to refresh your vision.

On the piece itself, two things stand out to me. First, the "reflections" in the eyes are much larger than in most sculptures where they are present. I do think such highlights add greatly to a sculpture, and in ancient works where they probably have been lost, I find the piece diminished greatly. Secondly, although you may not be able to change this now, working with photographs, I prefer a slight opening of the lips. On this model, the firmness of her mouth suggests she was somewhat nervous when photographed.

Overall, though, I emphasize this is an excellent work, your first or not.
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  #6  
Old 11-24-2006, 08:25 PM
mountshang mountshang is offline
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Re: A new sculpture is born

What do you think about it yourself ? (i.e. -- how does it compare -- on the various points that concern you -- with the examples of portrait sculpture that you enjoy the most ?)
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  #7  
Old 11-24-2006, 08:30 PM
mountshang mountshang is offline
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Re: A new sculpture is born

(whoops -- I somehow managed to submit my last post twice -- and I apologize for cluttering things up. My intended response was as follows: )

Thankyou, I think my question has been answered.

In response, I would only suggest that there are some examples of historical portraiture -- from Ancient Egypt onwards -- that show more than just specific mannerisms (of modeling an eyebrow, lip, nose etc) which, as you note, aren't worth copying anyway.

There are pieces that show a kind of declarative power that comes from an intense involvement in -- and consequent control of -- forms and space -- a kind of high intelligence of sculptural expression -- that's evident just like the smartness ( or dullness) of a new person that you meet eventually appears after they've been talking to you for a while.

And just as the sharpness or dullness of your own verbal expression gradually becomes evident while talking with admirable people --- so, too, the qualities of your sculpture might become evident in contrast to the sculpture you admire.

It doesn't seem like you have any particularly strong feelings about any sculpture from the past -- or , at least, not strong enough to make you want to emulate any of it -- and, of course, why should you ? People notice and feel certain things -- or they don't --- and in today's world of portrait sculpture -- the first priority is getting a "likeness" -- and after that everything is just personal mannerism --- or a sense of neatness/craftsmanship-- or sometimes a demand for the details of anatomical accuracy.


I don't really care for today's world of portrait sculpture.

I think it just fills the world with more things that are tedious - dull - lifeless- flaccid- and un-necessary.

But that's just my own -- eccentric -- and wildly unpopular -- opinion.
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  #8  
Old 11-26-2006, 02:44 AM
maxduro maxduro is offline
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Re: A new sculpture is born

Thank you fritchie, for your observations. The mouth is one of the core points in this sculpture and you noticed it immediatly. I am not satisfied with it even if it has a generally nice appearance and shape. However this is a trial right, so very liely I'll dismount the mouth (again) and I'll try to obtain something more natural.

mountshang, I do understand your point, really. One of the mian things that concerned my when I decided to try sculpting, was "what should I do when the sculpture is finished?". I was aware that even If I had put all my knoledge and patience in this work, the probabilities to accomplisch a masterpiece would have been very few. (well, it is my first sculpture!). Nonetheless I felt the urgence to try it and to touch the clay and move it under my hands... I decided not to care about what to do with the finished work. Very likely it will be photographed the best way I can and simply destroied to try again with another subject, maybe with the same clay (paperclay is wanderful from this point if view). Not yet in the stage where I feel that my works need to remain in this world...after their creation.
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  #9  
Old 11-26-2006, 12:07 PM
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HappySculpting HappySculpting is offline
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Re: A new sculpture is born

Quote:
Originally Posted by maxduro
Not yet in the stage where I feel that my works need to remain in this world...after their creation.
I do hope you'll keep your first works because they may become very special to you years down the road. You'll be able to gauge how much you've improved since the first ones. I used to be embarrassed of my first figures but now I have them on display and people find them very interesting in comparison with my current work. They like to see the "early" works.

....and this is such a wonderful first work. Wow! Keep going with it cuz you are good.

~Tamara
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  #10  
Old 11-26-2006, 06:13 PM
Multi_Pass Multi_Pass is offline
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Re: A new sculpture is born

The hair is lovely.

One thing I'm noticing is a little dimple on her right (our left) shouldler. It's just a depression from your thumb or finger, but with that lighting, it draws your eye to it and is a little distracting. Since the lighting is so dark on the face, chances are you have some more of these finger marks here and there. I would suggest looking it up and down and smoothing them out. Move the light source around and you should be able to catch and fix most of them.

Another thing I like about it is the way you cut off at the base of the neck at a diagnal. There's a guy at my school right now who conciders himself a master at portraits. I beg to differ, but that's beside the point. He isn't very good at figuring out where the bust should end. This one time he made a sculpture of a girl in the class and cut it off under her breasts. But he didn't do a good job of it. He made her breasts too high and also made them lay flat on the table with her shoulders and arms attached. It looked more like a droopy severed torso with bulbus orb like boobs resting on a table. So knowing where to stop is just as important as the rest of the piece.

And like someone else has already said, supplying a pic of the model you used would be best if you want an opinion on how well you rendered her proportions.
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  #11  
Old 11-27-2006, 05:59 AM
maxduro maxduro is offline
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Re: A new sculpture is born

Thx Tamara, now that at least a person in the world appreciated it, I think that my little sculpture has a reason to survive on!

Multi_Pass, Thanks for your observations. The lower part of the sculpture is not finished yet and hey! you've got really good eyes. I definitely need to smooth that part up. I normally work with a bench lamp lit in front of the sculpture and rotate it to put in evidence even small imperfections of the surface. And I think that if it looks good under that harsh light it must look good under any! but again, every bit of suggestion is precious for me at this stage!
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  #12  
Old 11-27-2006, 11:37 AM
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GlennT GlennT is offline
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Re: A new sculpture is born

I would like to echo what others have said about how good a first work the portrait is. Like Tamara, I would also urge you to either keep it or make a mold and plaster cast of it. Because it is your first piece, it has a lot of new thought, experience, expectation, and joy put into it. In later years it will be fun to look back and relive this, and also to see how you have progressed.

One critique item I have is that the pupils of the eyes have been so deeply hollowed out that the contrast of light and dark is very strong there. This is the only place where a contrast occurs to that degree. Whereas the eyes are important, some would argue the most important feature on the face, I think that if you were to subdue that contrast a little the entire piece would read better as a whole.

Keep up the good work!

GlennT
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  #13  
Old 11-29-2006, 07:45 AM
maxduro maxduro is offline
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Re: A new sculpture is born

One critique item I have is that the pupils of the eyes have been so deeply hollowed out that the contrast of light and dark is very strong there. This is the only place where a contrast occurs to that degree.

I thank you for the observation that I really understand and it' s a general very good suggestion. But i can assure that this strong contrast is partially due to the light that i used for the picture. The real sculpture looks a bit more homogeneus in terms of contrast.

nontheless i have to say that when I saw the pictures i really liked the high contrast in the popils and the vitality that it added to the expression of the face. consequently I am thinking of, actually, hollowing it more deeply to make it look like the pictures...

cheers
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