Sculpture Community - Sculpture.net  

Go Back  Sculpture Community - Sculpture.net > Sculpture Roundtable Discussions > Sculpture focus topics
User Name
Password
Home Sculpture Community Photo Gallery ISC Sculpture.org Register FAQ Members List Search New posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #26  
Old 04-23-2007, 04:11 PM
bhughes bhughes is offline
Level 3 user
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: baltimore maryland
Posts: 27
Re: "an artist cookbook"

Being from Maryland I put Old Bay on everything, especially tuna. My cheapest meal at my lowest low has to be a sauerkraut sandwich with mustard. I wish I had Old Bay for that monstrosity.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 04-23-2007, 05:03 PM
jim jim is offline
Level 7 user
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: minnesota
Posts: 142
Re: "an artist cookbook"

RING HOT DISH.

1. 1 can chicken cumbo soup ( do not add water to the soups )
2. 1 can chicken noodle soup
3. 1 can of cream corn
4. 1 lb of cooked ground hamburger ( add 2lbs if you want more meat)
5. 1 package of small ring noodles ( noodles need to be cooked before mixing)

6. Add all the ingredients in a baking dish mix a few minutes and bake for 1 hour 375 cover dish.....uncover the last 10 minutes..

Bread and butter goes great with this...taste even better the next day!

Jim....cost 10-12 bucks feeds 6 to 8
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 04-24-2007, 08:45 AM
evaldart's Avatar
evaldart evaldart is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: easthampton, massachusetts
Posts: 5,637
Re: "an artist cookbook"

Man this thread never fails to make me hungry.

Heres a good simple one for lengthy installations out in the field, but its got some pop so beware.

Matts mexican trail mix

I pound of your favorite beef jerky (preferably the stringy kind that you can pull apart)

half a bag of crumbled Tostitos (used to do it with Fritos but I like the other better)

1 can of french-fried onions in a can

1 chopped raw jalapeno pepper (you wont forget your jug of water again)

put it all in one of the big ziploc bags and shake it vigorously.
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 04-24-2007, 01:32 PM
jim jim is offline
Level 7 user
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: minnesota
Posts: 142
Thumbs down Re: "an artist cookbook"

Quote:
Originally Posted by evaldart
Man this thread never fails to make me hungry.

Heres a good simple one for lengthy installations out in the field, but its got some pop so beware.

Matts mexican trail mix

I pound of your favorite beef jerky (preferably the stringy kind that you can pull apart)

half a bag of crumbled Tostitos (used to do it with Fritos but I like the other better)

1 can of french-fried onions in a can

1 chopped raw jalapeno pepper (you wont forget your jug of water again)

put it all in one of the big ziploc bags and shake it vigorously.




Freakion nasty!!! ya dont forget T-paper
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 04-24-2007, 05:50 PM
StevenW's Avatar
StevenW StevenW is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Denver
Posts: 2,320
Re: "an artist cookbook"

Pacific North West Pickled Salmon Fiorito

1 side fresh salmon
1 onion, ends cut off and sliced lengthwise (Not burger style rings)
1 cup white vinegar
1/4 cup rice wine vinegar
1 tbsp balsamic vinegar
1/2 cup honey
1 and 1/2 cups Olive oil (Extra Virgin if you have it)
4 grade AA large eggs
1 splash Green Tabasco
1 splash soy sauce
1 sprig fresh rosemary
1 sprig fresh dill
1/2 fresh lemon
1 tsp sugar
1 toasted cedar plank (2 finger size)
1 freshly chiseled piece of yule Marble, rinsed thoroughly and dried (2 finger or nugget size)

Preparation:

Skin Salmon and cut into 1 inch cubes, cover and refrigerate, make sure it is very fresh.
Slice onion lengthwise and refrigerate covered.
Chop Dill and Pick rosemary leaves from the stem and leave covered with the onion.
Cut 1/2 lemon and refrigerate with "Mis en place" (Onion and other prepared herbs).

In a large mixing bowl, combine vinegars, honey, sauces and 2 fresh eggs and whisk for 1 minute until thoroughly combined. Add remaining 2 eggs and drizzle the Olive oil into the mixture while whisking until the mixture is emulsified. The consistency should be that of a light Italian dressing and you may adjust to thicken with more oil and an additional egg or thin it with some vinegar or additional citric acid like the other half of your lemon.

**Let the Emulsion rest for a few minutes to make sure that it doesn't "break" and if it does, add another egg and drizzle in a bit more oil while whisking. Note that it helps to have the eggs tempered or closer to room temperature as opposed to very cold and right out of the refrigerator, but of course due to concerns over Salmonella poisoning it is best not to leave them out too long (15-20 minutes should do).

You may use any clean and sanitized glass container for your pickled Salmon and I prefer simple Glass jars. Place the emulsion in your glass jar and add your Salmon so that it is on the bottom and then immerse the herbs and Onion Mis En Place and top it off with your Yule marble chunk. Allow the Salmon to pickle for 72 hours before consuming and roll the jar gently once or twice per day to help keep the dressing binded and to help prevent the oil from solidifying on the top. The Yule Marble will introduce an Oceanic flavor once the acids start to break it down and I often find that it helps neutralize the alkaline composition of the vinegars. This in turn prevents the Salmon from "burning". Since the mixture "cooks" the Salmon through a chemical process as opposed to a heat source. I recommend that you wait the full 3 days before serving.

I often like the Salmon as a snack or place it over a salad and because of the vinegars it has a shelf life of up to 10 days.

I hope you enjoy.

Steven

Last edited by StevenW : 04-24-2007 at 07:21 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 04-30-2007, 11:17 AM
evaldart's Avatar
evaldart evaldart is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: easthampton, massachusetts
Posts: 5,637
Re: "an artist cookbook"

Evaldart Beans and Franks

4 cans pork and beans

1 entire chopped onion

1 chopped green pepper

8 oz ketchup

1 entire package of ball-park franks (jumbo) sliced

4 tbs Lousiana hot sauce (Texas Pete is my favorite)

all in big cast iron skillet, low heat, 20 minutes

I get two gut-busters outta this. Garnish with sliced bread and butter.
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 05-08-2007, 12:43 PM
evaldart's Avatar
evaldart evaldart is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: easthampton, massachusetts
Posts: 5,637
Re: "an artist cookbook"

Well the good weather's here which means its meat-eating season. Time to char-up some animal flesh on the BBQ. Heres an inexpensive favorite of mine.

Legs, wings and thighs. These chicken pieces usually come in big bags (5-10 lbs) Get your grill heating on the low side ( I use charcoal so I make a small stack and spread em out).

Empty the entire bag of parts on the grill.

Salt and pepper as you mix them around.

It should take as long as you can stand it...an hour maybe if your heat is low enough. Just keep stirring them in the salt and pepper.

The grocery-store slaw and potato salad are already in big tubs on the picnic table.

Serve em up by the handful. Whoever ends up with the biggest pile of bones gets dibs on the last beer.
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 05-23-2007, 10:10 AM
BoatBird BoatBird is offline
Level 2 user
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Cyprus
Posts: 17
Re: "an artist cookbook"

Hey, this is turning into a Liveaboard/Cruisers dream cookbook! You try cooking with only tinned stuff etc....

Not only artists do this! Living in a harbour makes it a little easier for us, but a friend of ours is planning on cruising the world with no refrigeration at all.... and it can take in excess of 20 days to cross the Atlantic.

Minimalist lifestyle or what?!

One easy recipe is Corned Beef pie... where did I put it?!
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 05-23-2007, 08:00 PM
evaldart's Avatar
evaldart evaldart is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: easthampton, massachusetts
Posts: 5,637
Re: "an artist cookbook"

Having limped to the kitchen the big dummy, presently an automaton, assembles coffee, the wise-guy in the head still frolicking in on other planes of consciousness. The day properly in the hands of Mr. Coffee, a glance out the window lets-in through the eye-holes the image of the anvil warming itself in the morning light, a sheen of moisture lamenting its death-throes on the hot steel. A challenge is issued. The brain jumps on-board and the hands find themselves pouring the coffee befor its done...again. As the caffiene cappillaries itself around, the brain is considering fuel. What will it take to overcome that anvil once again? THE SHAKE!

The Shake

In the blender:

16 oz whole milk
three raw eggs
1 banana
one cup cheerios
two tbsp Ovaltine
one cup coffee

blend, guzzle and your hammering within ten minutes. Kickin butt on iron before your nieghbors even found their slippers.
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 05-24-2007, 09:44 AM
ironman ironman is offline
ISC Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Silver City, New Mexico
Posts: 1,603
Re: "an artist cookbook"

Hi, Fish recipe, works with any filet (tilapia, flounder, etc.) in a frying pan.
Juice of a lemon
equal amount of soy sauce
generous amount of butter
chopped clove of garlic

This recipe always turns out good.
Have a great day,
Jeff
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 10-13-2007, 06:57 PM
StevenW's Avatar
StevenW StevenW is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Denver
Posts: 2,320
Re: "an artist cookbook"

Yule Satay with Chile's and Garlic Sauce

1 Beef flank steak cleaned and trimmed
2 Rinsed chunks raw Yule marble
3 Jalapenos
I fresh bulb garlic
1 cup olive oil
1/4 cup Balsamic vinegar
1/4 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup honey
Salt and pepper to taste

On clean wooden surface or phony plastic cutting board trim and clean flank steak.
Whisk oil, balsamic, soy and honey until emulsification occurs.
Saute garlic bulb with small amount of olive oil, cool and peel spreading evenly.
Slice jalapenos on bias and arrange evenly over beef to distribute acidic concentrations.
Smother beef, Yule and ingredients with the Satay marinade and cover and refrigerate for minimum of 4 hours and maximum of 16 hours. Somewhere in-between is optimal for saturation without cooking the meat via chemical process.
Preheat oven to 425 degrees
Preheat cast iron skillet or no-stick saute pan (for sissies) and flash sear the beef flank steak with Kosher salt and fresh cracked black pepper. Control the heat of the pan with remaining marinade keeping in mind that you want to quickly sear the outside of the beef and not boil or drench it. This process takes only 1 to 2 minutes per side.

Once seared, add remaining Satay marinade and place skillet in the oven for 8 minutes and not one second more.
Remove skillet and place beef on a room temperature plate and allow it to rest for 5 minutes and no more.
Slice beef on a bias and serve over rice or caramelized onions and whatever fresh grilled vegetables are in season. Bamboo skewers are also used traditionally for this dish, but are by no means necessary.

Viola and enjoy.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	yulecarpaccio.jpg
Views:	162
Size:	64.1 KB
ID:	7139  Click image for larger version

Name:	yule.jpg
Views:	149
Size:	73.7 KB
ID:	7140  

Last edited by StevenW : 10-13-2007 at 08:14 PM.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


Sculpture Community, Sculpture.net
International Sculpture Center, Sculpture.org
vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Russ RuBert