Sculpture Community - Sculpture.net  

Go Back  Sculpture Community - Sculpture.net > Community Announcements > Polls
User Name
Password
Home Sculpture Community Photo Gallery ISC Sculpture.org Register FAQ Members List Search New posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 03-19-2007, 10:28 AM
Merlion's Avatar
Merlion Merlion is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Singapore
Posts: 3,716
Art Gallery Commission Practice

Being a bit naive about art gallery practices, just now I made a quick Google search on the commission charges of art galleries. They are mostly in the US. What I am a bit surprised is that the variation is not small, from 25 to 50 percent. This is of course from galleries openly mentioning this in their sites.

Some sites are quick to point out that they do not charge rental or fees out-front.

It would be interesting to know and exchange your experience without disclosing names of the galleries. But if you know if the galleries are commercial or non-profit, do mention this.
__________________
Merlion
www.onesunartist.com
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 03-19-2007, 04:11 PM
circeart's Avatar
circeart circeart is offline
Level 5 user
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Fullerton, Ca
Posts: 88
Re: Art Gallery Commission Practice

There's a online sculpture gallery that I believe also has a physical counterpart. After contacting them for information, I was told that first there is a one time membership fee of around $200.

Once a member, you can post photos of as much work as you desire, as long as it was made by you and is of the quality they approved of on your initial application. After that, for any of your sculpture sales they handle solely and completely through their website, they retain a 33% commission.

They'll provide an optional link to your personal site, and the first year of that feature is free, with an annual fee of around $100 I think. The commission for sales that go though your personal website that came through the link from their site is 10%.

However, if they sell your work through their physical gallery located in Scottsdale Arizona, they ask a 50% commission, but I believe they do not ask for an area specific exclusivity agreement.

They treat the customers well and ask that the artist's work be insured during shipping and that the artists honors any agreed upon arrangements etc.

All this sounds pretty fair to me and if they really do make the sales, this could be a nice benefit to all parties involved. I'm considering this venue for my bronzes but am curious as to what you think about this method of exhibiting work. I didn't mention their name but will upon request if anyone is interested.
__________________
Circe
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 03-19-2007, 04:43 PM
evaldart's Avatar
evaldart evaldart is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: easthampton, massachusetts
Posts: 5,636
Re: Art Gallery Commission Practice

From my experience artbuyers like to see the work in person and possibly even meet the artist. What if the piece appears different than it actually is. Some works are photogenic, and some works lose effectiveness in digital reproduction. For all practical purposes they are buying things "sight unseen". Couldn't all this muddle the transaction.
But maybe artbuyers are getting used to doing it this way. These types of venues must be surviving somehow.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 03-20-2007, 07:05 AM
tonofelephant's Avatar
tonofelephant tonofelephant is offline
ISC Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Martinsburg, WV
Posts: 705
Re: Art Gallery Commission Practice

Circe,

I must be an out-of-touch luddite. I don't understand why an artist would want to pay to have their work in a gallery. There is no incentive for the gallery to sell their work. The only incentive that the gallery has is to get more artists to pay the "membership" fee. That way the gallery does no more work and gets paid more. Great business plan.

From the gallery's point of view I can understand the appeal. The gallery now has a steady supply of money coming in from artists who crave representation. All the gallery needs is 10 new artists a year to say yes to get an additional $2,000/year gratis with no work involved. The work involved to put your work on their website is negilible - an hour at most. More than likely they already have a staffer at the gallery that takes care of all their represented artist updates for the gallery. They do not have to promote your work or anything else to get the $200 or $100/yr. They just have to keep you needy and insecure as an artist. In NYC this is called a vanity gallery.

What you need is a gallery(s) that will show your work in person, build your reputation (while building theirs), and treat you honestly. A gallery that will relentlessly go after the client and wrest money from them in exchange for your art. These galleries are out there you just need to find them. A true gallerists job is to find great artists and promote them. This is what they live for - to find the next artist that will take the world by storm.

Beside one more point to consider. If I am a gallery owner with a website and you approach me. If your work is so-so or I don't have space for you, and I find out that you are with a vanity gallery - that would tell me that you are guillable (sp). If you would pay this other gallery to display your work on their website - I could more than likely get you to do that also. This would increase my revenue also without impacting my physical gallery space. Very cool - I am in business to make money after all. Now you have a problem - two galleries are charging you to be on their websites and you still have no active representation. Instead of getting an active sales force to sell your work you have just created another bill (like Visa or MasterCard) to pay. See how this snowballs? It is not a pretty picture.

The thing to remember is that you are in business just like the gallery is. You are trying to make a living with your art. Most people I encounter think it is nice ( as in "aw thats nice", and bunnies - read naive) that I am an artist. I need to remind myself and that person that I am not an artist that happens to be in business - I am in business and my segment happens to be art. There is a difference.

Carl
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03-20-2007, 09:28 AM
Merlion's Avatar
Merlion Merlion is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Singapore
Posts: 3,716
Re: Art Gallery Commission Practice

Just now I zoom my search on the co-op art galleries formed by a number of artists. I just look for art galleries and cannot distinguish those selling mainly sculptures, mainly paintings or a good mixture of both.

The first link New co-op to promote native artist says,

He explained that the co-op's artwork will be sold on a commission basis, with 65 percent of the sale price going directly to the artist. On average, Indian artisans usually only receive about 30 percent, he said.

Artwork in the co-op will also be promoted and sold internationally through the gallery's Internet Web site.

In the Gallup gallery, Jamon is planning to feature the work of one native artist each month and hold a reception for that artist during the monthly Arts Crawl.


The second link Sunshine Coast Artists Co-operative says,

Members who volunteer are given priority in exhibiting their work, and are charged 20 percent commission on sales. The co-op charges 35 percent commission on all sales for non-volunteering members.

The third link Artists join forces to show and sell their art says,

The artists in the gallery are selected through a juried process. The amount of wall space will limit the number of painters, but Carol Wright says there's still room for artists who create sculptures, pottery, and jewelry.

If selected the artist will pay $150 up front and then $50 a month. The gallery gets a 20 percent commission on all items sold.
__________________
Merlion
www.onesunartist.com
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 03-21-2007, 03:39 AM
circeart's Avatar
circeart circeart is offline
Level 5 user
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Fullerton, Ca
Posts: 88
Re: Art Gallery Commission Practice

Quote:
The thing to remember is that you are in business just like the gallery is. You are trying to make a living with your art........I need to remind myself and that person that I am not an artist that happens to be in business - I am in business and my segment happens to be art. There is a difference.
A lot of very good points, they should work from commission like anybody else with nothing upfront. And if they won't do that, then they're not in the artist's best interest.
__________________
Circe
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 03-21-2007, 10:19 AM
robertpulley robertpulley is offline
ISC Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Columbus, Indiana
Posts: 104
Re: Art Gallery Commission Practice

I'm not sure if I understand the question, but my experience with commercial art galleries in the Midwest is that the split is 50/50. When I used to show in what I would call "craft' galleries the split was sometimes 60% artist 40% gallery. These galleries would sometimes purchase pottery, etc. outright for 50% of retail. Non commercial galleries at universities that offer one time shows usually get 30% of sales. I have never been there personally, but someone told me that some New York galleries split 40% artist and 60% gallery. I would not pay to have my work in a gallery.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


Sculpture Community, Sculpture.net
International Sculpture Center, Sculpture.org
vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Russ RuBert