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  #1  
Old 10-18-2008, 08:33 AM
PTsideshow PTsideshow is offline
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Who owns what power tool brand and where is the company headquartered

Here is an interesting section on a woodworkers web site. The manufacture section goes in depth about the history of each manufacture. Under each manufacture, you can read more about each of their power tools they offer.
And for instance who makes the Kmart, Craftsman tool and products

Sears and Craftsman Source Product Code

LISTING OF SOURCES BY SOURCE NUMBER
For many products, the first three numbers of the Model Number (usually followed by a decimal point) indicate the actual manufacturer of the product. For instance 316.43234 is a cordless drill built by Ryobi.

Milwaukee Power Tool Company is a privately held company located in Hong Kong and is an industry leading manufacture of heavy duty tools used worldwide.
Along with all the other name brands. Who woulda thunk that Black&Decker owns Dewalt, Porter Cable, Delta and others making it the world's largest tool maker.
Here is an eye opener on a Saturday morning
http://professional-power-tool-guide.com/manufacturers/
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  #2  
Old 10-18-2008, 09:41 AM
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Ries Ries is offline
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Re: Who owns what power tool brand and where is the company headquartered

At this point, I pretty much only buy Bosch.
I do have a fair amount of old Milwaukee warhorses, made in the USA, like my rotohammer, sawzall, and holeshooter- but I recently was in Phoenix on a job, and my helper had neglected to pack the milwaukee holeshooter, so I had to buy a Bosch drill (over 400 holes to drill in 1/4" stainless) and it is FAR superior to my ten year old made in USA milwaukee.

I suppose I wouldnt kick Fein tools out of bed either, but they are really expensive.

Another interesting fact is that Jet, Powermatic, Wilton, and Performax are all owned by the Swiss company Walter Meier. In Switzerland, Meier mostly make air handling equipment, and is well over a billion dollar a year company.
Most people think Jet is chinese or something- but it was actually started in the late 50's by a Jewish Junkyard owner in Tacoma Washington, to import Japanese chainfalls, and then it grew from there.
The Swiss bought it in 1992, I think. And then they bought Wilton, and Powermatic, in the last 5 years or so.
Production for all three is worldwide- there are still some Wilton and Powermatic products made in the USA, some from China and Taiwan, and some from europe- Wilton drill presses, at least the better ones, have always been euro- either swedish Arboga's, or Spanish Ibarra's, rebadged. And Jet has sold a variety of euro lathes over the years as well.

Its a small world.
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  #3  
Old 10-18-2008, 06:25 PM
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Aaron Schroeder Aaron Schroeder is offline
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Re: Who owns what power tool brand and where is the company headquartered

I don't care who owns whom. All I care about is that the bearings, windings, switches and gears can take the heat. Metallurgy and tool geometry are everything when it comes to performance. They never list the properties that truelly count, I guess they think we're too stupid to understand ( perhaps they are right ? ). I tend to smoke switches and windings the most, only the makita lived long enough to have it's gears wear out. What fails when it fails for the rest of you ...?
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  #4  
Old 10-18-2008, 10:17 PM
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Merlion Merlion is offline
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Re: Who owns what power tool brand and where is the company headquartered

For power tools, I mainly use Makita. They're reliable, smooth design and reasonable price. Others are Bosch and even Black & Decker.

But I agree with Aaron. Who finally owns the company does not really matter. The brand name does matter of course.
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  #5  
Old 10-19-2008, 06:41 AM
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Re: Who owns what power tool brand and where is the company headquartered

There was a time when I would save the toasted tools (grinders and drills mostly) and take them in for rehab but the cost became almost half of a new tool and of course it would take them months to do it...and in the end the thing would burn-out again soon enough anyway.

That 150 dollar bosch electric drill IS a good one (my present main drill) but I have enjoyed the Milwaukee hole shooter too (always the hammer versions). When things were more about "business" I always bought Metabo everything. You could tell by the feel that they were better. But again, they really couldn't outlast 2 models half their price.

I've toasted them every way possible. Smoke and burnig plastic is sometimes involved, stripped chucks and arbors, switches indeed (I especially like it when the switch breaks in the "ON" position so you have to plug it in to get it going...and then you forget this little feature and the thing jumps out of your hand or accross the table...nice). Sometimes they fall off a ladder, scaffold or a balcony (no tool can survive ten stories...but the hole-shooter once survived 4 in the dirt). I recently ran over a Craftsman grinder with my wifes car (Honda Element)...survived just fine. Thank god it wasnt the F-350. Rain...aah yes, I work outside alot so a few have been ruined by water...but usually if you just let em dry out they're okay.
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  #6  
Old 10-20-2008, 02:57 PM
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danthoman danthoman is offline
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Re: Who owns what power tool brand and where is the company headquartered

I used to buy only porter cable and bosch but in the last 6 to 12 months everything bosch I've purchased has been garbage. I used to swear by their tools, now I only swear at them. I bought a Milwaukee angle drill several years ago and burned up 3 before the year warranty ran out. Lately I been buying dewalt and rigid.
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  #7  
Old 10-20-2008, 06:04 PM
anatomist1 anatomist1 is offline
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Re: Who owns what power tool brand and where is the company headquartered

Some of the Rigid is made by Metabo. I just shopped for a jigsaw and that one was, though I went with the Bosch instead due to better design features and review consensus. Most Rigid seems pretty sturdy. I have an uncle who is a master housebuilder and he says most anything new Rigid he has gotten has been excellent.

However, I disagree with blanket name brand loyalty as a way to choose any product. It's better to take each item on a case-by-case basis and do research on the exact models in contention. So I really don't care who owns what. I care about the actual tool model and putting together all the reports I can find about how it performs.
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  #8  
Old 10-21-2008, 07:12 AM
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tonofelephant tonofelephant is offline
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Re: Who owns what power tool brand and where is the company headquartered

This year has been an especially hard year on tools. Drills have been particularly hit hard. I seem to enjoy stripping the chucks out so they cannot hold a bit. A lot of that has been from doing stone work I understand that. Since I got the Makita hammer drill, all the other drills (a rigid and a B & D) have breathed a sigh of relief.

The best tool I have bought recently was second hand. It was a Makita Reciporciting Saw. Since burning up the last Recipro Saw I have been lusting after another one but just could not spend the money - other things were more important. One day after taking the B & D drill to the repair guy I noticed that there were tools that they had repaired and the owner had not picked up. Several trips back and forth later with various tools being serviced I bought the Recipro Saw for the cost of the brushes being replaced - $50. It is a wonder of design, comfort and brutishness. Compact, weighted just right, and tears through studs, rafters and metal and is hungry for more. It makes doing demolition work a pleasure - what demo work should be instead of a chore.

Carl
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  #9  
Old 10-21-2008, 08:18 AM
wolff wolff is offline
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Re: Who owns what power tool brand and where is the company headquartered

I like Makita too (drill, planer, belt sander). Bosch and Hitachi are the two main competitors here. I was very irritated to discover, however, that Makita Japan and Makita USA are distinct companies, making locating parts (even things like brushes or blades for planers) a serious liability. My Bosch tools (grinder, jigsaw) are nicely designed, but feel (and are priced as if) made cheaply in China. I don`t use them seriously enough to have burned them up in the year or two I`ve owned them.

Quote:
The best tool I have bought recently was second hand. It was a Makita Reciporciting Saw. Since burning up the last Recipro Saw I have been lusting after another one but just could not spend the money - other things were more important. One day after taking the B & D drill to the repair guy I noticed that there were tools that they had repaired and the owner had not picked up. Several trips back and forth later with various tools being serviced I bought the Recipro Saw for the cost of the brushes being replaced - $50. It is a wonder of design, comfort and brutishness. Compact, weighted just right, and tears through studs, rafters and metal and is hungry for more. It makes doing demolition work a pleasure - what demo work should be instead of a chore.
My personal favorite tool modification has been tack welding 5 coarse saw blades onto a single tang for a reciprocating saw. Makes a great and assertive power rasp.

I like my electric Hitachi, but I really miss my Stihl chainsaws...

Bill
www.billwolff.net
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  #10  
Old 11-15-2008, 11:55 AM
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marblecutter marblecutter is offline
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Re: Who owns what power tool brand and where is the company headquartered

[quote= I tend to smoke switches and windings the most, only the makita lived long enough to have it's gears wear out. What fails when it fails for the rest of you ...?[/QUOTE]

I encounter the same problem with power tools: Heat. They get hot very quickly. What I do is use several at different intervals. That way they all receive ample time to cool and rest. If I use only one, then I would have to stop when the tool gets too hot. It also helps to keep them clean after every use. I take them apart and remove all the dust that is sucked in and around the wire coils, starting the next day with clean instruments. Dust build-up induces over-heating and exhaustion.
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  #11  
Old 11-15-2008, 02:16 PM
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StevenW StevenW is offline
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Re: Who owns what power tool brand and where is the company headquartered

Quote:
Originally Posted by marblecutter View Post
I encounter the same problem with power tools: Heat. They get hot very quickly..

Right.. I think the best thing to do for longevity, particularly when you're cutting rock is to let the tool run at no-load and at high speed for a minute or so after you're done with it. Most of my grinders are variable speed makita's and it's good for them to run at high speed because they are air cooled and they eject more dust at high speed than low. I also don't buy the blanket brand-name idea.. My dad's Black and Decker 3/4" drill is not the same 3/4" drill they make now. Years ago they made heavy-duty, quality tools and his still works after 35 years having only the cord or brushes replaced. I also have a 35 year old workmate bench, B&D and it's still good and today they make these playschool plastic workmates. I think the outlet plays a big role as companies make distinct lines of tools for different markets. The Lowes and Home Depot makita's are pale imitations of the ones I get at Tool King and are only made for light use.

The one area I'm hurting in is with pen-tools and I have a box full of burnt up dremels and the like. I have higher power die grinders but they are unweildy for detail work and the Konig that I want eats up too much air. I did get a flex shaft this week that runs on a roto-zip and it works ok, but is not ideal either as far as I'm concerned. This year has been good for new tools and innovation, particularly with abrasives such as the new gator-grit line of quick change disks and such..
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