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-   -   A "carving" experiment (http://www.sculpture.net/community/showthread.php?t=10344)

evaldart 08-19-2010 08:10 PM

A "carving" experiment
 
4 Attachment(s)
After an unexpected deployment of the notion of carving with the torch on the head of Perseus on the Medusa sculpture, I decided to execute an aside. A small, simply gestured, piece of figuration that explores the possibilities of the ace-torche's gouging, slicing, and digging.

RWJR is the resident authority in this area - and since I have said more than once that I wanted to be HIM when I grew up...here we go. My carving efforts thus far - infantile and clumsy (but those parts of my character have usually worked in my favor by the addition of a fierce obliviousness:D).

Its not done yet, but close. It is not so much about any "refining" - simply some "meat" on and off in a few more places; and perhaps a shortening of the torso (it takes ten seconds to cut right through and accomplish MAJOR proportional alterations).

evaldart 08-19-2010 08:11 PM

Re: A "carving" experiment
 
3 Attachment(s)
And a couple more. He's two feet tall. Working title "Farmers Walk".

StevenW 08-19-2010 09:39 PM

Re: A "carving" experiment
 
Mighty fine Matthew.

grommet 08-19-2010 10:11 PM

Re: A "carving" experiment
 
yes, once again, the gesture carries the day. The roughness works with the purposeful eyes-to-the-ground look.

rika 08-19-2010 10:26 PM

Re: A "carving" experiment
 
Yes, it found you! This technique is sooo right for you E. That side view in the last of the first row is FANTASTIC. So, what did it feel like? Did the earth shatter under your feet?? Must have. Can't wait to see the evolvement of your figuration.

jOe~ 08-19-2010 10:30 PM

Re: A "carving" experiment
 
I think its an excellent start. The farmer does need to bulk up a bit. In some of the views the farmer has the build of a 15 year girl.

evaldart 08-19-2010 10:44 PM

Re: A "carving" experiment
 
I have never been totally satisfied with only assembling bits of scrap...there is always an aggressive manipulation involved to let the process participate fully. So having this as yet another way of "having-my-way" with the matter is exciting.
Of course this will growing into a need for yet improved gear, as I'm not likely to remain with small works. And now, as the compositions are solidified the weights will be even more demanding (in material cost as well as handling).

But the best part is when the air-arc gouging torch aims errantly and back-splashes you with torrents of white-hot liquified steel. boots, cuffs and crevices become entryways for the stuff to find skin. I am spotted with tiny craters. But I cant do the leather costume...WAY too hindering and mummifying. Extra layers of the usual thrift store fare will have to do, I suppose.

Thanks

evaldart 08-19-2010 10:49 PM

Re: A "carving" experiment
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by jOe~ (Post 93588)
I think its an excellent start. The farmer does need to bulk up a bit. In some of the views the farmer has the build of a 15 year girl.

You're right Joe...some "flesh" will be added...but I must be careful not to make the thing about anatomy - cause that is another entire thing to address...a focus there always diminishes gesture "woodens" the thing; improves in very realistic efforts. So I will bulk him up only in the interest of proportion.

fritchie 08-20-2010 04:45 AM

Re: A "carving" experiment
 
Another exciting start, Ev. I like the gesture very much, and as you say, that's the real thing about sculpture. You make it sound like you're near a volcano vent when you work that way.

tobias 08-20-2010 08:45 AM

Re: A "carving" experiment
 
E it looks like you have done a fair bit of adding to this piece already. Just from the original mock up of bits to where it stands now. I think in order to get away from adding you do need to start with bigger chunks and be ready to remove more material.
I think (in a more direct way) that you would benefit from going big.
I would have started with a 2 foot by 4 inch chunk of plate. Carved it flat then heated it and bent it.

evaldart 08-20-2010 11:53 AM

Re: A "carving" experiment
 
I thought of that T, but theres a "Gumby" element to that that I didnt like. The idea of beginning with the cookie-cut version of a figure put me off in the sense that no matter how thick it was it was beginning flat. And the long clumsy curves that arrive when you bend chunkss like that would not serve the visual "points" of stance. I decided that the gesture would best be served if certain angles were "built" into the solid mass before I started the carving. I dont mind that I "get happy" and over-attack on the removal side of things because steel can always be put back on.

What number tip are you using T, to cut that 2" plate. I'm working so far with a plain ol #5 but suspect that a 7 would do better (quicker).

The gasoline torch just moved way up on the list.

ironman 08-20-2010 01:13 PM

Re: A "carving" experiment
 
Nice work Matt, I've seen RWJR's work in a sculpture garden at an art museum in Florida and you're right, it is awesome.
Your piece gives him a run for his money.
Jeff

evaldart 08-20-2010 01:34 PM

Re: A "carving" experiment
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ironman (Post 93605)
Nice work Matt, I've seen RWJR's work in a sculpture garden at an art museum in Florida and you're right, it is awesome.
Your piece gives him a run for his money.
Jeff

Thanks Jeff but I doubt that. Anyhows I've done all I feel like to this first one and I'll have the pics up later on.

rderr.com 08-20-2010 03:08 PM

Re: A "carving" experiment
 
Wondering what you've been so quite about. Good.

Robert

evaldart 08-20-2010 08:45 PM

Re: A "carving" experiment
 
4 Attachment(s)
Okay, here 's the "farmer" walking it out.

evaldart 08-20-2010 08:46 PM

Re: A "carving" experiment
 
2 Attachment(s)
And the last two........

cheesepaws 08-20-2010 09:03 PM

Re: A "carving" experiment
 
Glad you got this out of your system. Time to get back to the real work eh? :)

jOe~ 08-20-2010 09:18 PM

Re: A "carving" experiment
 
If you didn't call it farmer I'd really like it. It doesn't suggest farmer at all. John Henry for sure. Or some iron worker. But not a farmer. I don't think you could win over any of the farmers around here with that. These guys don't have that feminine body type.

evaldart 08-20-2010 09:26 PM

Re: A "carving" experiment
 
Cheese, you are antagonizing my all consuming intellectual rift between abstraction and figuration. And the more intelligent I get (at least I hope its going in that direction), the more I MUST reconcile the two. By no means do I have any special respect for tradition, yet as the compositional sensibility gets advanced it partakes often from the trivialities that fed it. I dont imagine that I will ever have the figure out of my system; yet I fully realize that "form" is the way to fulfilling. Duality is only the first step to forever....plurality happens after - and if you aint got the nerve....then you're just makin little silly things over and over again.

cheesepaws 08-20-2010 09:56 PM

Re: A "carving" experiment
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by evaldart (Post 93623)
Cheese, you are antagonizing my all consuming intellectual rift between abstraction and figuration. And the more intelligent I get (at least I hope its going in that direction), the more I MUST reconcile the two.

Lets leave figuration out of it! Your “rift” is situated between a desire to work both representationally and abstractly.

Well rifts are good things filled with chaotic energy and a wealth of creative possibilities! You don’t want those competing desires to ever get reconciled like some sad sack odd couple. Feed the friction. This new piece surely has merit – but it gives into to a kind of intellectual complacency (and technical skill) too easily. Be honest, it was too easy – wasn’t it?

For me, most of your “regular” abstraction speaks more to the figure than this tiny guy. Your unashamed material choice and the physicality required to sculpt them are all about the possibilities of the human form. Likewise, your materiality holds an uncommon relationship to your forms – every work I’ve seen you post shares that awesome tension between the “representation” of steel and the abstraction that grows from its manipulation. THAT’S the your struggle embodied.

rika 08-20-2010 10:04 PM

Re: A "carving" experiment
 
He looks like a doomsday survivor to me, with his heavy walk and a face with little detail.
I don't find the body type feminine, it's lean and tall but masculine. I love the partially covered body parts (arms, knee caps) that reveal the skeleton. The texture is awesome as well. And the base is perfect. Very successful first take.

scrapartoz 08-21-2010 03:11 AM

Re: A "carving" experiment
 
I like the way you have captured the body shape. i do not like the stance he could be a zombie or soldier doing mine clearing operations . doesnt look like a farmer at all. perhaps if you gave him two buckets of water to carry it would help. but I love the general style, texture and your skill with a gouger.
you are versatlile in your attacks on this thing we do.

rderr.com 08-21-2010 09:13 AM

Re: A "carving" experiment
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by evaldart (Post 93623)
Cheese, you are antagonizing my all consuming intellectual rift between abstraction and figuration. And the more intelligent I get (at least I hope its going in that direction), the more I MUST reconcile the two. By no means do I have any special respect for tradition, yet as the compositional sensibility gets advanced it partakes often from the trivialities that fed it. I dont imagine that I will ever have the figure out of my system; yet I fully realize that "form" is the way to fulfilling. Duality is only the first step to forever....plurality happens after - and if you aint got the nerve....then you're just makin little silly things over and over again.

There is no rift only the desire to bridge, to communicate, to provoke.

Bob

Nelson 08-22-2010 08:56 AM

Re: A "carving" experiment
 
As a farmer, I find no relating to him. A surviver from some melt down, or some other chaotic event...?:D In all, at first it appeared much more robotic as consecuence of the parent material pieces you pre assambled, but it`s taken shape harmonicaly as you chopped and pasted steel into a form that`s pleasant. Sure a surprise to us acustomed to see your abstract inmersion, nonetheless not objectable respecting that, on the contrary, a legitimate and effective exploration. You may probably avoid pursuing better and better proportions and realism. My taste goes towards that style where the overall image purposely deformed, best describes personal styles and not classical art dogmas. Just a question E, are you using plasma cutter or an inverter AC/DC TIG welder. I do want to put my hands on one of the latter kind. In your opinion, which "size" would be the minimum required to chop steel of the thickness material you`ve used in THe Farmer? Thanks.

evaldart 08-22-2010 02:51 PM

Re: A "carving" experiment
 
Only Scrap has remotely identified what this stance has to do with a farmer (nothing at all). There is such an event in strength-based athletic competition called the "Farmers Walk". It has more to do with challenges of power, pain and endurance...and nothing to do with farming or any farmers. Metaphors are a good way IN to figuration. I should have called it "Gouged Fig #1".

No plasma cutter Nelson...totally the wrong tool for this process. I am using an air arc gouger, a regular ace torch w #5 tip, and various hammers for "beating-in". Nothing fancy at all. Oh and a plain ol 250 mig welder (varying wire speed for effect).


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